Tag Archive: pd


The Hindu : Arts / Magazine : Are we facing an evolutionary crisis?.

It seems that the human race is beginning to lose its intellectual and emotional abilities.

Albert Einstein, in Out of My Later Years, warned us not to trust our intellect because it had no conscience though it had muscles.

But the suspicion that the attributes of mind — intellect, intelligence, wit, et al — are proving to be increasingly less dependable for the fundamental needs of life (peace, happiness and a certain stability of faith in the very purpose of life) has been felt for sometime now.

Concrete cases were cited that could lead to the hypothesis that deep within man a hitherto ignored constituent of consciousness was demanding recognition and its suppression could lead to several problems, mental, emotional and physical. What had been for ages an experience only with Yogis and mystics, an aspect of consciousness that was its very basis and which sustained the whole structure of our being despite its other constituents like mind and emotions constantly fighting among themselves, was probably at last trying to assert itself, slowly but surely, in the life of a greater number of people.

According to Sri Aurobindo, “At present mankind is undergoing an evolutionary crisis in which is concealed a choice of its destiny; for a stage has been reached in which the human mind has achieved in certain directions an enormous development while in others it stands arrested and bewildered and can no longer find its way.” Sri Aurobindo envisions a future when the mind could be transformed into a Supramental gnosis.

Dr. Crabtree’s thesis leaves us with a choice between two attitudes: we resign to a future when technology would mould our fate, our mind growing cipher, or we cultivate a collective aspiration to release what remains involved in our consciousness. To a professor who was logically convinced of Sri Aurobindo’s vision but wondered if the ugly man of today could really grow into something beautiful, a rustic school teacher told, “If a wonder like the lotus could bloom out of mud with the Sun’s Grace, why cant out of our muddy mind bloom the Supramental with the Divine’s Grace? We may replace Divine’s Grace with Evolutionary thrust, if we please.

http://www.marcandangel.com/2013/01/08/12-things-you-should-never-stop-doing/ –  Start doing these things now and never stop…

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/memory-plays-truant/article4324629.ece Memory plays truant – Despite the rising number of people with dementia, awareness of the problem and support for caregivers is abysmal,………….. Where will we get nurses/helpers we can trust and who are also trained in dementia care?

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/crime-and-punishment/article4324619.ece – Guilt and shame, inevitable human emotions that usually serve a constructive purpose, can sometimes assume pathological proportions.    (had  read Crime and Punishment  Fyodor Dostoyevsky – mentioned in this article – eons ago – shud read it again…………..)

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/great-statesmen-great-lovers-of-books/article4303270.ece – The weather and temperature in Kerala imparted a special smell to those magazines. The heat, the golden light coming through the windows, the smell of mangoes and the silence broken only by the tick-tock of a clock on the ground floor: the summer of 62 is a summer never to be forgotten. My passion for reading grew stronger with every passing day. Very soon I agreed with Logan Pearsall Smith, “They say life’s the thing, but I prefer reading.”

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/wellness-read/article4303279.ece

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/dancing-with-the-divine/article4349452.ece

Dancing with the divine

The dance I dance becomes more beautiful each day,

When I can open my heart and swing both ways.

To feel for the ones I like and even those I don’t.

What a blessing to be shown,

That I can dance better being connected yet detached.

Involved in the music yet matching step

With the one I’m dancing with.

Being aware of the other’s grip

And of my hold, I was told,

Not to cling tight, but relax.

Yet fear of falling and failing can impede grace.

I also know one can be consumed in the race.

Of getting to some other wonderful place

That promises peace

And I start to relax right now into a space,

Where, my emotions do not make me ill at ease.

And in that softening

I find the opening to slip away

From grips that are hard

And hearts that are cold

The more I dance the less I fear

I glide away from the familiar

And yet it all seems the same

The dance where I twirl

Not afraid to unfurl

Into all my glory

I see myself entwined

Dancing with the divine

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/treasures-of-spain/article4349453.ece –    Massive stone foundations and medieval ruins, dating back two thousand years, lie along the town’s plaza and now serve as a meeting point. The interiors of homes, cafes, restaurants, bars and even banks, are still adorned by Roman arches; their own personal souvenirs from history. The oldest shop that stands in the town dates back to the 1700s, and has been continuing its legacy of selling candles for almost 300 years. The cobbled streets culminate in the colossal Catedral de Tarragona, which is perhaps the only evidence of Moorish influence on the town; Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance eras are equally reflected in the cathedral’s architecture.

The lane with the painted dividers.PhotoS: Shivya Nath

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/blueprint-for-a-life/article4349446.ece  –  Mukund Padmanabhan looks back fondly at his days in the small and unusual Blue Mountain School, Ooty.  ……………was pleased to see “the school beginning to smarten up a bit and the children looking a bit less… wild.” I was extremely pleased to learn that it was Pearce who thought up asthachal , that simple but beautiful practice where children collect on a hillock in the evenings to watch the sun go down in quiet reflection.

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/internet/the-great-tech-party/article4344353.ece

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-fridayreview/an-interface-between-art-and-heritage/article4342146.ece

Landmark event:(Clockwise from left) An installation by Subodh Gupta; Ibrahim Quraishi's installation titled ‘Islamic Violins'; Artist K. Raghunadhan with his unfinished work; an installation made by students of art design and communication of CEPT University, Gujarat.Photos: H. Vibhu, K.K. Mustafah,Thulasi Kakkat

Landmark event:(Clockwise from left) An installation by Subodh Gupta; Ibrahim Quraishi's installation titled ‘Islamic Violins'; Artist K. Raghunadhan with his unfinished work; an installation made by students of art design and communication of CEPT University, Gujarat.Photos: H. Vibhu, K.K. Mustafah,Thulasi Kakkat

Yuko Hasegawa, chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and currently preparing to host the Sharjah Biennale, expresses the same sentiment. “The city of Kochi with its layers of architectural historicity has definitely been tapped by the project hosts. The biennale has used historical heritage to a very good sequence,” she says, adding that on her first visit itself the biennale gets the viewers right into the different aspects of the city. In most other biennales she feels that the dialogue with the city goes missing.

To commence and continue this dialogue, is what Bose says, has been his main aim. “We have intentionally stressed on the cultural aspect,” he says. Driven by the wish to extricate art from the white cubes and open it up was one factor that comes across in the KMB. The Let’s Talk programme, its Educational Outreach programme, the cultural programmes that include theatre, music, performance arts and so on clearly take art to the people in a way never accessed before.

Chris Dercon, director of Tate Modern, senses that openness when he says: “What IS different is that this biennial functions as a perfect vehicle for ‘performing the difference’: a public friendly ‘diy (Do It Yourself) platform for visual culture’ initiated and organised by artists, with and for artists. As a platform it unites and re-unites Indian contemporary artists who are showing an intellectual and visual ‘togetherness’ as never before. As a visitor, everybody can step in and make up one’s mind.”

Art critic and culture theorist Ranjit Hoskote believes that the curators of the biennale have given credit to an audience ready to accept the changing face of art, showcased here. “Exhibitions, especially biennales, are opportunities to expand one’s mental and experiential horizons as viewers – they should not be reduced to fit the size of one’s assumptions. A great many of the works are geared to affect the viewer at a primal, sensory, sensuous level even before their conceptual strategies came into play – through smell, shadow, sound. Today, viewers are more willing to experiment with new artistic experiences than before.”

E, MUSINGS

IFM -Nov 25, 2012 –   excerpts from the speeches

MOVING TOWARDS MATERIALISM-BASED SOCIETY WILL MAKE US EXTINCT

  • KEEPING A STRONGHOLD ON SPIRITUALITY IS THE ONLY WAY
  • IN THE WEST PRIESTS TRACE THEIR ANCESTRY TO KINGS  – IN INDIA KINGS USED TO TRACE THEIR ANCESTRY TO SEMI-NAKED SAGES ( does it mean real royalty is simplicity ????  )
  • desires accumulate – build up slowly and eliminate dharma from the mind
  • we are guided by what we see
  • deep study of upanishads and the gita – to live in the world of materialism
  • PERSONALITY UNFOLDING OR DEVELOPMENT CANNOT BE DONE UNLESS CONNECTED TO A HIGHER POTENTIAL – THE MONKS TODAY
  • shankar bhashyam
  • GANDHIJI ,RAMANA MAHRSHI , LB SHASTRI DID NOT PREACH DHARMA  THEY LIVED IT
  • RAMAKRISHNA PARAMHAMSA TREATED IRON , MONEY AND MUD EQUALLY
  • ACC TO UPANISHADS – UNLESS WE REDUCE / ELIMINATE DESIRES WE CANNOT LIVE A LIFE OF DHARMA
  • THERE HAS BEEN A TREMENDOUS INCREASE IN KAMAS – DESIRES NOW

DHARMA – NOTHING BUT COMMON SENSE

q,fav,pd,links

“If I had my life to live over,” said Nadine Stair at age 85, “I would perhaps have more actual problems, but I’d have fewer imaginary ones.”

Your task, as I see it, will be to train yourself so you can expertly distinguish

actual problems from imaginary ones. Part of your work, of course, will be to

get in the habit of immediately ejecting any of the imaginary kind the

moment you notice them creeping up on you.

http://www.thehindu.com/arts/history-and-culture/when-going-elsewhere-is-to-leave-beauty-behind/article4097683.ece

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jun/17/philosophy-life-jules-evans-review?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487

STOP WORRYING

1) STOP WORRYING —-It is injurious to mind.

 2) DO NOT ENVY   —–It is a waste of time n energy.
 3) ACCEPT UR LIMITATIONS —-All of us cannot b great.
 4) HAVE FAITH IN PEOPLE—-If u r trustworhty,he can also be.
 5) READ A BOOK—-It will stimulate imagination.
 6) FIND A GOOD HOBBY—-It will relax ur nerves.
 7) SPEND SOME TIME ALONE—-It will give u peace.
 8) HAVE AN INTIMATE FRIEND—-He will share ur sorrow.
 9) TRUST IN GOD—-Do ur best n leave with HIM the rest.
10) BEGIN THE DAY WITH PRAYER—-It will warm ur soul.
11) THINK POSITIVE—-It will solve ur problems.
12) RESPECT THE ELDERS—-One day u will be elder.
13) KEEP UR TEMPER—-You cannot afford to loose it.
14) BELIEVE IN YOURSELF—-It is within u.
15) DO NOT RUN AFTER HAPPINESS—-It is within u.
16) NEVER WASTE TIME—-It is valuable asset.
17) DO NOT UPSET WITH SUNSET—-Sun will rise tomorrow.
18) LOVE EVERYBODY—-You will be loved by all.
19) BE CONFIDENT—-You can do anything.
20) ENJOY PRESENT MOMENT—-Past is past,future is unknown.
21) KEEP PRACTICAL APPROACH—-It is way to happiness.
22) CONTROL UR ANGER—-It adds ‘D’ n become Danger.
23) BE SOFT SPOKEN—-World is full of noise.
24) THINK BIG—-That will make u big.
25) WORK HARD—-There is no substitute.
26) KEEP SMILING—-It will increase ur face value.
27) BE CREATIVE—-You can convert challenge into opportunity.
28) CONTROL UR LANGUAGE—-It reflects ur character.
29) REMOVE UR FEAR—-GOD is always with u.
30) DO ‘CHINTAN’ DAILY—-It is food for the soul.

http://kathrynvercillo.hubpages.com/hub/10-Ways-to-Calm-Down-When-Anxiety-Strikes

http://balajipalamadai.blogspot.in/2010/06/phalaharini-kali-puja.html

books

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, author of “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention

http://observedinbooks.blogspot.in/2008/02/complete-artists-way-by-julia-cameron.html

ShiningSoulYoga

Many people think of exercising and fitness as something that only takes place at a gym or fitness facility. Unfortunately, they are overlooking the fact that

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Japanese Tea Ceremony

A solemn traditional Japanese tea ceremony conducted with deliberateness.

Beautiful kimono. Oh and, for you all who don’t see the reason for going through “all that trouble,” the tea ceremony is about more than the drinking of tea — and at the same time, it is about less. More about being quiet and meditative, thoughtful and deliberate, graceful and simple. It is about entering a calm, meditative state of mind and momentarily slipping into a more intimate relationship with those present. Not about guzzling tea. Though the tea does have meaning itself. Look it up.

Rkmath

http://www.rkmath.org/retreats

Life progresses by continual affirmation and negation. If we are to understand the proper value and significance of a thing, we have to observe it with a detached vision. By renouncing we gain. Our day’s work would have lost all charm and ground down our soul if we had not the oblivion of nightly sleep. This is a truth, the profundity of which often escapes us. We think that to do the best in anything we must be attached to it. We forget that attachment binds and to that extent limits our powers and capacity to accomplish. It is in inner detachment that we go beyond limitations and that our being flows in unimpeded streams.

To learn and practice such detachment we must time and again retreat and introspect about our journey, its direction, its speed and destination. We must have a break and a pause which make as hold on to the eternal and the permanent more strongly. We gain strength thereby to look upon the world and its concerns with an amused eye. After all, to act is not our vocation. To think or to feel also is not our nature. To be, that is our real nature. To be, to become the eternal, beyond all change and necessity of change, that is the goa

Steve Jobs Quotes

quotations on: [Life]
Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.
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Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Adress, 2005

– More quotations on: [Death]

Sometimes life is going to hit you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith.

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Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Adress, 2005

You can’t connect the dots looking forward you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something: your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well worn path.

Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Adress, 2005

– More quotations on: [Confidence]

“We don’t get a chance to do that many things, and every one should be really excellent. Because this is our life.      Life is brief, and then you die, you know?          And we’ve all chosen to do this with our lives. So it better be damn good. It better be worth it.”

“Almost everything–all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure–these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

“Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes… the ones who see things differently — they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

“In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer. It’s interior decorating. It’s the fabric of the curtains of the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a human-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service.”

“Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations.”

“Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me … Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.”

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

“I’m the only person I know that’s lost a quarter of a billion dollars in one year…. It’s very character-building.”

“I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.”

“Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is much better than two doubles.”

“I’ve always wanted to own and control the primary technology in everything we do.”

“It comes from saying no to 1,000 things to make sure we don’t get on the wrong track or try to do too much.”

“I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.”

“It’s rare that you see an artist in his 30s or 40s able to really contribute something amazing.”

“I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.”

“Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water or do you want a chance to change the world?”

“The products suck! There’s no sex in them anymore!”

“The cure for Apple is not cost-cutting. The cure for Apple is to innovate its way out of its current predicament.”

q

observe and question but don’t debate

……………….  it is your perspective on past and future that determines your life each day. View the past not as good or bad but as necessary and valuable in the making of the future.

… So we beat on, boats against the current,
borne back ceaselessly into the past…..

F. Scott Fitzgerald,  The Great Gatsby

………………………………… Stop holding all that pain in. Let it out! Let it go. Get it over with. And get everything you’ve been putting off out of the way. Let  the truth about your past can be buffeted to the surface where you, and possibly others, can finally accept it for what it is.

Go back over your life’s journey and remember everything you’ve done, everyone you’ve met, everywhere you’ve been, everything you’ve lost and gained, given and taken; your thoughts, your feelings, your love, your happiness, your anger, your fears, your passions, your ideas, your laughter, your tears, your satisfaction and your guilt – everything.

Even if you believe you are living fully in the moment, you will now learn just how cleverly you have mastered the art of denial. Just look at what is happening in the world and you will realize that denial of reality is precisely what is keeping the turmoil going.

The same is true of your own situation. As issues of the past continue to bombard your present-day reality, you will know that continued denial is no longer an option. The past is always present. The past shapes the present, and only your full acceptance of the past – the recent past included – can bring you into a much needed state of ease. As you start to feel more comfortable with your past, you will be able to feel yourself moving into the richness of present time. And from the present, you can point yourself in the direction you want your future to take.

Your past is your truth, your experience. It is what it took to bring you to where you are. It is what it took to make you the person you are, and to inspire you to be the person you are meant to become.

You may not have all the answers, but you can sense that the best is yet to come. Your emotions are not the enemy. Emotional denial is the enemy. Your feelings simply require the freedom to express themselves.

Stop denying that you’re afraid of what might lay ahead. No one can know what the future holds, but we do know that what the present holds is sure to influence it. That is why letting go of the pain or fear you are holding onto is so important now.

You may feel an emptiness inside after this emotional release because of the sheer pressure that has left your body. Guilt may try to fill the space you have created by telling you that it is wrong to be so emotional. Guilt does not want this healing to take place; it simply wants you to feel guilty. Recognize guilt’s wretched voice and move away from it, without denying its existence. Then you will be able to remember that happiness is also an emotion which needs to be expressed as and when it arises.

It is clear that you are moving inward through layers of
yourself, sometimes with what seems like terrifying speed and at other
times, barely fast enough. This is a journey toward something within you,
some seed idea or core concept that has, in truth, guided your whole life so
far. As you proceed inward, you may feel compelled to cast off aspects of
yourself, to confront seeming “flaws” in your nature, and to endure what
seem like personal losses. This will be easier if you remember that these
are merely layers of yourself you no longer need, and that what seem to be
sacrifices will move you faster toward embodying your untouched and
invulnerable inner spirit.

yoga for controlling anger

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1061211/asp/atleisure/story_7103091.asp

Advasana

Lie down on your stomach, with the forehead resting on the floor. The big toes should be touching each other and the heels should be allowed to flop to the sides. If you find difficulty in breathing, place a pillow under the chest.Breathing: As you breathe naturally and without extra effort, notice the gentle rising and falling of the spinal column. Surrender yourself to the floor and gradually start breathing longer and deeper. Try to breathe steadily. You can continue in this position for as long as you wish.Benefits: This is a position of surrender and makes the mind calm down rapidly. If you have a short temper, this asana will help to a great extent. When you feel that you are on the verge of an emotional outburst, move away from the situation and lie down in advasana. Keep focusing on the incoming and outgoing breath rather than your agitated thoughts. Shashankasana (Rabbit posture)

You can easily visualise an angry person, animal or bird, but you will find it very difficult to visualise an angry rabbit. This is what Shashankasana helps you to achieve.

Do this asana for a few minutes every day. If you find it difficult to bring your forehead to the floor, use a cushion for support. Keep the big toes together and the heels outwards and sit with the buttocks in the space between the heels. Try to settle down in this posture, allowing the spinal column to stretch fully. Continue sitting in this manner for a few minutes.

Breathing: Breathe in a relaxed and normal manner. Sheetali Pranayama Sit in any comfortable cross-legged posture, close your eyes and relax the body. Put your tongue out as much as possible and turn the sides of the tongue upwards, trying to bring the edges together to form a tube.Breathing: Inhale deeply through this tube, draw in the tongue, close your mouth and then exhale through the nostrils. When you are inhaling through the tube, there should be a sound of air rushing in. Once again, open the mouth, form the tube, inhale, close the mouth and exhale through the nostrils. Continue this for one to two minutes.

During the summers, you can do this pranayama for a longer period.

WARNING: People with low blood pressure and respiratory tract disorders should avoid doing this asana. Those with heart diseases should not attempt breath retention.The best time for this pranayama is late at night — before you retire for the day, or early in the morning — when it is relatively silent outside. If you are extremely tensed up, you can do it for up to half-an-hour. However, it must be done sitting down. Once again, if you have heart ailments, avoid breath retention.