Tag Archive: minimalist


retro /art deco design

http://www.beinteriordecorator.com/interior-design-lords-south-beach-hotel-fabulous-and-colourful-design/

he Cha Cha Rooster bar offers a glamorous setting for cocktails, the interiors are chic and feature custom-designed graphics the lobby lounge is a place where one can enjoy the eclectic mix of architecture and design

return to this inspirational collection of spaces. The exquisite interiors of the hotel express a strong desire to travel beautifully and be surrounded by colours and a cheerful atmosphere

outdoor space acts as the social hub of the house.

Photography by Greg Richardson

design minimalist dining room and kitchen with modern furnituredesign minimalist dining room and kitchen with modern furniture

interior design dining room and living room in one room with modern furnitureinterior design dining room and living room in one room with modern furniture

interior design minimalist a living room with modern sofainterior design minimalist a living room with modern sofa

the grand double storey outdoor space acts as the social hub of the house

urniture give a refreshing feeling. interior design living room with wooden roof and modern furniture in bright colors

travel beautifully and be surrounded by colours and a cheerful atmosphere interior design bedroom with spirited and cheerful design , perfect for vacations

Steve Jobs Quotes

quotations on: [Life]
Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.
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Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Adress, 2005

– More quotations on: [Death]

Sometimes life is going to hit you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith.

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Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Adress, 2005

You can’t connect the dots looking forward you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something: your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well worn path.

Steve Jobs, Stanford Commencement Adress, 2005

– More quotations on: [Confidence]

“We don’t get a chance to do that many things, and every one should be really excellent. Because this is our life.      Life is brief, and then you die, you know?          And we’ve all chosen to do this with our lives. So it better be damn good. It better be worth it.”

“Almost everything–all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure–these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

“Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes… the ones who see things differently — they’re not fond of rules… You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things… they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

“In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer. It’s interior decorating. It’s the fabric of the curtains of the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a human-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service.”

“Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations.”

“Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me … Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful… that’s what matters to me.”

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”

“I’m the only person I know that’s lost a quarter of a billion dollars in one year…. It’s very character-building.”

“I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.”

“Quality is more important than quantity. One home run is much better than two doubles.”

“I’ve always wanted to own and control the primary technology in everything we do.”

“It comes from saying no to 1,000 things to make sure we don’t get on the wrong track or try to do too much.”

“I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.”

“It’s rare that you see an artist in his 30s or 40s able to really contribute something amazing.”

“I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.”

“Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water or do you want a chance to change the world?”

“The products suck! There’s no sex in them anymore!”

“The cure for Apple is not cost-cutting. The cure for Apple is to innovate its way out of its current predicament.”

zen

http://zen.thetao.info/do/index.htm   So the monk that was compassionate but never studied, was reborn into wealth without intelligence.  The monk that studied without practicing good works, had insight, but no means of survival.  It is through meditation and compassionate works that we can achieve enlightenment.

http://www.aboutzen.info/read/taonzen.htm – ‘Taoist Emptiness’ is completely different to ‘Buddhism Emptiness’. The Emptiness in the Tao is about restraint, patience, frugality, simplicity, lack of worldly desire etc. These are all good things for Buddhists, but they have nothing whatever to do with Buddhist Emptiness, which is about the inaccuracy of our perceptions of relativity and the fictional objects that are created from that misunderstanding
http://www.dailyzen.com/homey.asp –

We loosely talk of Self-realization, for lack of a better term. But how can one real-ize or make real that which alone is real? All we need to do is to give up our habit of regarding as real that which is unreal. All religious practices are meant solely to help us do this. When we stop regarding the unreal as real, then reality alone will remain, and we will be that.

– Ramana Marharshi (1879-1950)

http://www.dailyzen.com/meditate.asp

zen

http://www.phoenixcentre.com/blog/2007/11/12/10-quick-examples-of-zen-living/

http://www.howtowakeupearly.com/Start-on-day-one.aspx

Full many a glorious morning have I seen
 Flatter the mountain tops with sovereign eye,
Kissing with golden face the meadows green,
 Gilding pale streams with heavenly alchemy;
Anon permit the basest clouds to ride
 With ugly rack on his celestial face,
And from the forlorn world his visage hide,
 Stealing unseen to west with this disgrace:

http://www.phoenixcentre.com/blog/2008/07/07/essential/

leisure – slowness

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00sj5z5

W. H. Davies

Money, O!

When I had money, money, O!
I knew no joy till I went poor;
For many a false man as a friend
Came knocking all day at my door.

Then felt I like a child that holds
A trumpet that he must not blow
Because a man is dead; I dared
Not speak to let this false world know.

Much have I thought of life, and seen
How poor men’s hearts are ever light;
And how their wives do hum like bees
About their work from morn till night.

So, when I hear these poor ones laugh,
And see the rich ones coldly frown
Poor men, think I, need not go up
So much as rich men should come down.

When I had money, money, O!
My many friends proved all untrue;
But now I have no money, O!
My friends are real, though very few

W. H. Davies

Leisure

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00sj5z5

WHAT is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare?—

No time to stand beneath the boughs,
And stare as long as sheep and cows:

No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass:

No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night:

No time to turn at Beauty’s glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance:

No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eyes began?

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.

https://excerptsandm.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/tiantanbuddha-1.jpg?w=300

https://i2.wp.com/travelerfolio.com/travelerfolio/photos/tian_tan_buddha_lantau_island_hong_kong.jpg

https://excerptsandm.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/hk11.jpg?w=300

goals

http://www.missminimalist.com/2010/09/minimalist-philosophy-wildflower-goals/

When you spend time in the blogosphere, you hear a lot of talk about goals: personal goals, professional goals, finance goals, development goals, creative goals, short-term goals, long-term goals, etc. (Sometimes it can be exhausting just reading about them all!)

And if you’re a blogger, you’ll inevitably be asked to talk about your own goals. The question often comes up during interviews, and should be a snap to answer, right? Err, not for me.

You see, I’ve never been good at long-term planning – I don’t really like to outline (or even know) where I’m going to be one, five, or ten years from now. Accordingly, I’ve always been reluctant to define, write down, or consciously work toward a set of prescribed goals.

I was chatting about this with my husband the other day, while we were on one of our countryside walks. Over the last year, we’ve been marveling at the ever-changing panorama of wildflowers, and every time we go out, we look forward to what new beauty awaits us. We’ve been treated to bluebells, Queen Anne’s lace, poppies, thistles, wild roses, sowbread, and fields full of blooms we’ll never identify. No one plants them, fertilizes them, waters them, or otherwise cultivates them – they just spring forth, wild, ungroomed, and spontaneous, surprising and delighting us.

I like to think of my goals the same way: popping up like wildflowers, changing with the seasons, dazzling me with their spontaneity and variety.

Sometimes my goal is to finish writing a book, sometimes it’s keeping up with my blog, sometimes it’s learning key phrases in Italian, Hungarian, or Japanese. Sometimes my goals are easy (cook an edible dinner), sometimes they’re challenging (perfect a certain yoga pose), and sometimes they’re ridiculously farfetched (interest Oprah in minimalist living). They vary from day to day, week to week, month to month. Sometimes I have a whole bouquet of goals, and sometimes I don’t have any at all.

With that in mind, here’s my short guide to having wildflower goals:

1. Give them fertile ground. Keep an open mind, stimulate your intellect, interact with interesting people, and take advantage of interesting opportunities. For optimum growth, expose your goals to as much water and sunlight (in the form of other people’s opinions, ideas, and feedback) as possible.

2. Keep an eye out for new varieties. Sometimes we’re so focused on certain goals, we neglect to notice, or nurture, new ones that arise. Regularly survey your landscape, and don’t let those promising new buds escape your attention.

3. Let them surprise and delight you. Leave room for new and unexpected goals in between the ones you’ve “planted.” Learning to paint or play a musical instrument may spring up spontaneously among your more “serious” goals – instead of dismissing them as frivolous, embrace them as a wonderful new flowering of your interests.

4. Let them grow on their own. Don’t feel compelled to tend to your goals every minute of every day. The hardy ones will survive just fine on their own, ready for you to pick and pursue them when the time is right.

5. Let them change with the seasons. Instead of rigidly defining your goals, allow them to develop more fluidly. Goals you set last year may no longer be as relevant or desirable to you now – instead of forcing them to bloom, let them go to seed. Embrace new ones that arise in their place.

Of course, I’m not suggesting that you shouldn’t set goals – they’re a fabulous way to help you stay focused and motivated. Rather, I’m saying that you shouldn’t feel compelled to clip, manicure, and overly tend to them. They should be a source of joy and self-discovery, rather than stress or frustration.

How does this relate to minimalist living? Well, when we’re loaded down with stuff, and wrapped up in consumer pursuits, we tend to have tunnel vision. We plod along in a straight line, and pay little attention to what’s going on at the periphery. We concentrate on the goals we set forth last year (or many years ago), and rarely stop for re-evaluation.

Minimalist living eliminates the distractions – the clutter, the chores, the debt – that devour our time and energy. When we’re not slaves to our to-do lists, we have the freedom to relax, wander about, and explore new possibilities.

So let your mental garden grow wild once in a while – you may be surprised what springs forth!

When you spend time in the blogosphere, you hear a lot of talk about goals: personal goals, professional goals, finance goals, development goals, creative goals, short-term goals, long-term goals, etc. (Sometimes it can be exhausting just reading about them all!)

And if you’re a blogger, you’ll inevitably be asked to talk about your own goals. The question often comes up during interviews, and should be a snap to answer, right? Err, not for me.

You see, I’ve never been good at long-term planning – I don’t really like to outline (or even know) where I’m going to be one, five, or ten years from now. Accordingly, I’ve always been reluctant to define, write down, or consciously work toward a set of prescribed goals.

I was chatting about this with my husband the other day, while we were on one of our countryside walks. Over the last year, we’ve been marveling at the ever-changing panorama of wildflowers, and every time we go out, we look forward to what new beauty awaits us. We’ve been treated to bluebells, Queen Anne’s lace, poppies, thistles, wild roses, sowbread, and fields full of blooms we’ll never identify. No one plants them, fertilizes them, waters them, or otherwise cultivates them – they just spring forth, wild, ungroomed, and spontaneous, surprising and delighting us.

I like to think of my goals the same way: popping up like wildflowers, changing with the seasons, dazzling me with their spontaneity and variety.

<!–[if !supportEmptyParas]–> <!–[endif]–>

Sometimes my goal is to finish writing a book, sometimes it’s keeping up with my blog, sometimes it’s learning key phrases in Spanish, Hungarian, or Japanese. Sometimes my goals are easy (cook an edible dinner), sometimes they’re challenging (perfect a certain yoga pose), and sometimes they’re ridiculously farfetched (interest Oprah in minimalist living). They vary from day to day, week to week, month to month. Sometimes I have a whole bouquet of goals, and sometimes I don’t have any at all.

<!–[if !supportEmptyParas]–> <!–[endif]–>

With that in mind, here’s my short guide to having wildflower goals:

1. Give them fertile ground. Keep an open mind, stimulate your intellect, interact with interesting people, and take advantage of interesting opportunities. For optimum growth, expose your goals to as much water and sunlight (in the form of other people’s opinions, ideas, and feedback) as possible.

2. Keep an eye out for new varieties. Sometimes we’re so focused on certain goals, we neglect to notice, or nurture, new ones that arise. Regularly survey your landscape, and don’t let those promising new buds escape your attention.

<!–[if !supportEmptyParas]–> <!–[endif]–>

3. Let them surprise and delight you. Leave room for new and unexpected goals in between the ones you’ve “planted.” Learning to paint or play a musical instrument may spring up spontaneously among your more “serious” goals – instead of dismissing them as frivolous, embrace them as a wonderful new flowering of your interests.

<!–[if !supportEmptyParas]–> <!–[endif]–>

4. Let them grow on their own. Don’t feel compelled to tend to your goals every minute of every day. The hardy ones will survive just fine on their own, ready for you to pick and pursue them when the time is right.

5. Let them change with the seasons. Instead of rigidly defining your goals, allow them to develop more fluidly. Goals you set last year may no longer be as relevant or desirable to you now – instead of forcing them to bloom, let them go to seed. Embrace new ones that arise in their place.

Of course, I’m not suggesting that you shouldn’t set goals – they’re a fabulous way to help you stay focused and motivated. Rather, I’m saying that you shouldn’t feel compelled to clip, manicure, and overly tend to them. They should be a source of joy and self-discovery, rather than stress or frustration.

Let your mental garden grow wild once in a while. You’ll feel more relaxed and serene, and may be surprised what springs forth!

e from Zen Habits

  • http://zenhabits.net/balance/

  • Simplicity. Simplicity is probably the

    most important part of life balance. When

    you build your life around simplicity you

    reduce the number of out-of-balance

    things that can disrupt your happy living.

    In balance everything is simple. There are

    two opposites (like black and white) and

    you just have to pick something in the

    middle:

    • Simplify you work schedule so that you

      do not have to think about a hundred

      things at the same time.

    • Simplify your relationships by

      connecting with people you truly care

      about and getting rid of the ones you

      don’t.

    • Simplify your diet by choosing simple

      healthy ingredients that are part of

      balanced nutrition.

    • Simplify your social media exposure

      and enjoy living life and getting things

      done rather than wasting time online.

    Simplicity makes life balance simple.

love the way this house combines minimalism with retro -retro minimalism

http://www.archdaily.com/68887/stribrna-skalice-house-prodesi-domesi/img_6841/

Stribrna Skalice House - Prodesi - Domesi  © Lina Németh

the lightsStribrna Skalice House - Prodesi - Domesi  © Lina NémethStribrna Skalice House - Prodesi - Domesi  © Lina NémethStribrna Skalice House - Prodesi - Domesi  © Lina Németh