Tag Archive: links


https://www.racked.com/2016/3/14/11173148/kinfolk-lifestyle-magazines

Unlike reading a newspaper, reading a lifestyle magazine is more an aesthetic than functional choice, a way of pursuing higher, or at least less immediate, interests like art, fashion, food, and good manners.

Lifestyle magazines are treated as light fare, but they fulfill the deeper purpose of helping us define ourselves. A publication like Godey’s Lady’s Book, founded by Louis A. Godey in Philadelphia in 1830, included fiction and poetry, as well as recipes and how-to guides outlining a “moral, maternal lifestyle —€” this is how women should be,” Haveman says. Editors published letters from loyal readers, and a consensus about how to live a particular kind of life formed over time.

What separates true lifestyle magazines from the likes of Harper’s, the New Yorker, or even N+1, which might obliquely define certain ways of life, is the sense of commodified identity that can be found in a publication like Cosmopolitan, described by founding editor Paul Schlicht as a “family magazine” when it launched in 1886.

The lifestyle magazine demonstrates what to consume as well as how to behave, and this ethos has informed how newspapers define their lifestyle content as well. In the 1950s, the New York Times summarized its women’s pages as “Food, Fashion, Family, and Furnishings.” Jacqui Shine’s comprehensive essay on The Awl shows how the women’s pages gradually evolved into a “Living Style” section that the Times launched in 1978, now known simply as Styles, with its signature “ambiguous variety of cultural reporting and criticism,” as Shine writes, a mix that continues to define lifestyle editorial today.

It’s worth noting that many popular lifestyle entities were, and continue to be, directed at women; the relationship to the domestic often means that the term itself is unfairly gendered. However, it is in fact an equal opportunity genre. GQ and Esquire became the dominant lifestyle magazines for men during the later 20th century, with “lad mags” like Maxim and FHM flaring up in the ’90s. Still more titles are unisex.

The category might be best summed up by what Adam Moss called the New York Times Magazine‘s iconic front-of-book section under his editorship in the 1990s: “The Way We Live Now.” (Though the Times Magazine isn’t a lifestyle magazine, Moss’s FOB section as well as his current domain, New York magazine, reflect an aspirational urban mode of living.) The successful lifestyle magazine is a mirror that reflects the trends of our times back at us, only a little prettier, more polished, and less complicated. It is “designed to either turn one’s life’s preferences into cliches, or turn cliches into your life preferences,” says Mental Floss executive editor Foster Kamer —€” often both at the same time.

Kinfolk’s Kin

Many independent print magazines populate Kinfolk’s wake. They often share its minimalist design, heavy stock, and serene photography, but each presents a slightly different shade of lifestyle. Here, a short list.

Alpine Modern: A Boulder, Colorado-based magazine, store, and cafe focusing on the concept of “elevated living,” both literal and figurative.

Smith Journal: An Australian quarterly that covers a quirky mix of “thinkers, adventurers, and makers.”

Four & Sons: A print and online publication “where dogs and culture collide” documenting a canine-friendly lifestyle.

Cereal: This Bristol, U.K. quarterly concerns “travel and style,” including branded accessories and city guides sold alongside the magazine.

Another Escape: “An outdoor lifestyle, creative culture, and sustainable living publication that explores the stories of passionate people.”

Drift: A New York-based title about “coffee, the people who drink it, and the cities they inhabit,” with truly insane column widths.

Les Others: A biannual French magazine and digital platform focusing on “fresh air and creativity.”

Provencial: This American quarterly’s mission is to “encourage a lifestyle of balance with a clear and intentional delineation between work and rest.”

 

By the mid-2000s, lifestyle magazines had become multi-platform lifestyle brands, moving from providing readers a sense of intangible community to creating the non-editorial products readers actually consume in order to solidify that sense of belonging. You can now buy a Monocle cardigan or croissant, or live in a pre-fab home designed by the shelter magazine Dwell. Print may have become less relevant with the advent of the internet, but businesses pushing aesthetically-conscious consumption are even more relevant as we document our every move on Snapchat and Instagram.

But it’s meant to be looked at more than read. The magazine’s large format, embossed serif logo, striking covers, and heavy stock have come to define the latest generation of lifestyle magazines. It’s now possible to find Kinfolk clones covering everything from mountain climbing to fatherhood to the joys of dog ownership. The copycats only serve to magnify the sense that Kinfolk really is everywhere.


Kinfolk itself is content with staying mysterious; it’s part of the brand. The company doesn’t release news about itself, and its websites are comically light on background information. After a month’s worth of emails, however, Nathan Williams agrees to meet for lunch near the magazine’s new headquarters in Copenhagen. (Still under renovation, the office is not yet “a comprehensive representation of the brand,” the communications director Jessica Gray warns me.) I book a flight departing a few days later and land in a wintry city, the sky flat and gray like matte paper.

Williams’s careful posture and soft voice seem of a piece with his upbringing. He often pauses to think about or check on his words. During these pauses, he purses his mouth, glances into the distance, and then soldiers on, having confirmed the proper valence of his sentence, often murmuring “yeah” in agreement with himself.

The late aughts could be considered an apogee for lifestyle blogging, a more diaristic and less nakedly monetized medium than its print equivalent, and Mormons led the charge.

 

Beyond its Mormon credo, Williams chose BYU Hawaii for its strong international business program, helped along by a scholarship offer. There, Williams studied economics in the footsteps of his father, an economics professor, “but I knew that I wasn’t really going to find something in that field I would enjoy.”

The late aughts could be considered an apogee for lifestyle blogging, a more diaristic and less nakedly monetized medium than its print equivalent, and Mormons led the charge. That was when Dooce and its proprietor Heather Armstrong, “queen of the mommy bloggers,” as the New York Times described her, hit peak popularity; Armstrong had attended Brigham Young University in Utah, but left the church before turning to blogging.

 

A spread from Kinfolk‘s winter 2016 design issue. Photo: Ouur Media

Mormon lifestyle blogging also intersected with the peak of flanneled artisanal hipsterdom that occurred around the same time. A 2012 article in Trinity College’s Religion in the News chalked this up to the recession. Without money to spend, “millennials have begun to look towards social gratification as a means of self-worth,” doubling down on close circles of friends and shopping at thrift stores for retro fashion.

The idea was to create a title that did talk about things we thought were important, a focus on community, slowing down, quality of life.”

 

 

The Copenhagen studio of Stine Gam and Enrico Fratesi was featured in the summer 2015 issue. Photo: Anders Schønnemann

 

With issue sales mounting into the tens of thousands, the team moved to Portland in September 2012, where they brought their staff up to a dozen and launched an event series that saw official Kinfolk dinner parties hosted all over the world. These were documented in easily parodied videos in which, for example, a picnic table perfectly set for 12 suddenly appears atop a picturesque cliff that the attractive diners later leap off of into the ocean.

Kinfolk hit a cultural nerve that went far beyond the print magazine. “I don’t think we created anything new, maybe it’s just collected in a certain spot and presented in a certain way,” Williams says. “How many people post and share Kinfolk on Instagram, it’s kind of bizarre. It turned into its own beast that we have no control over.” Williams doesn’t have a personal Instagram and the official magazine account only posts once or twice a week, but #kinfolk is used about once a minute.

the magazine’s oppressive neatness also seemed like a mold followers had to fit into, performing m for the sake of an Instagram photo. “Everyone feels like every little part of their life has to be perfect. Nothing looks real anymore,” he continues. “You spend 20 minutes setting up your morning coffee with a copy of Kinfolk on a marble countertop.”


 

The editor is acutely aware of his magazine’s reputation. “We have our haters. There’s definitely a misconception that Kinfolk is more of an aesthetic and less of a,” Williams pauses at length before continuing, “company, or publication with at least some substance. The idea that some folks think it’s full of editorials of girls running through daisy fields with flower crowns, which, it’s not. God, no.”

Kinfolk‘s editorial mission has morphed into a larger pursuit of what Williams calls “intentionality”: “figuring out what’s most important to us and then finding a way to actually spend our time and energy on those things.” As Doug Bischoff puts it, “It’s kind of self-help content, but done in a way that appeals to our readership, paired with interesting writing and art direction.”

A Parisian dining room shot for the design issue. Photo: Anders Schønnemann

The magazine confronts our never-ending search for authentic connection, particularly in the internet era. “We’re on our laptops, on our phones all the time, that in itself is fine,” Williams says. “But the flip side is that it does create an appetite for real life, for relationships, for genuine bonds with the people around us. Kinfolk leverages that appetite.” For the duration of our lunch, Williams’s out-of-date iPhone doesn’t emerge from his pocket once.

This notion of authenticity has resonated around the world. Sales were strong in Japan even from the initial issues, and media companies there as well as in China, Korea, and Russia eventually inked syndication deals to translate and produce their own editions of Kinfolk, with careful oversight from the Portland team. Through an agent in Japan, the company hooked up with the local brand Actus to produce a line of clothing, austere outfits that a friend of mine visiting Tokyo described as “a cross between Muji and Everlane,” as well as a series of ascetic housewares, both under the label Ouur Collection. With the name “Ouur,” “the idea is we’re bringing together likeminded designs and ideas,” Williams says. But the significance of the name “just kind of turned into bogus.”

Ouur is modeling itself on businesses like BuzzFeed, Vice, and Vox (parent company to Racked), among many other media companies subsidizing their original editorial content with creative studio branches.


 

The lifestyle was better in Denmark, too. As Kinfolk might also imagine its readers, the Danes perennially rank among the happiest people in the world. “The work-life balance, it’s definitely a good fit for that. Most Danes don’t work past 3,” Williams says. Alongside the Danish emphasis on family, which Bischoff appreciates as he and his wife raise their two small children, there’s a “borderline laziness,” he says, then stops short. “I shouldn’t say that. They know how to spend their time wisely.”

“Even their ‘Imperfect’ issue was perfect in every way, shape, and form.”

Williams changed along with his company. As recently as 2012, he identified with Mormonism, but no longer does, nor does Katie (Doug and Paige Bischoff are the only two Mormons left on staff, Williams later writes over email). When I ask him to elaborate, he declines, preferring to leave religion out of the conversation. It’s clear, however, that Kinfolk has also become more inclusive.

I ask Williams if these editorial shifts were an intentional effort to change the magazine’s early notoriety as a bastion of white hipsterdom. “The first few issues it was really just an oversight,” he says. “If 90 percent of our shoots are happening in Copenhagen, Stockholm, Portland, I know people don’t like to hear it, but they’re actually not very diverse communities. That’s no excuse. You make it work, you figure out how to properly represent your readership. That’s what we’re doing now.”

Yet there remains a sanctimoniousness to Kinfolk. It portrays a right way of doing things set against an invisible wrong, packaging anxieties over topics like family, friendship, and connection in the guise of rustic tablescapes and drapey garments. Even if its models are more diverse, the magazine still has a pervasive air of whiteness about it, in the overall aesthetic homogeneity and the quest for a self-professed “purity.” As photographer Andrew Lee notes, “even their ‘Imperfect’ issue was perfect in every way, shape, and form.”

Kinfolk still offers a one-size-fits-all-who-seek-it lifestyle solution with little tolerance for mess. The increasingly rarified image of luxurious simplicity that it projects is far from possible, desirable, or even recognizable for everyone.

 


A few days after meeting Williams, I moved from my hotel into an apartment in Nørrebro, a hip neighborhood across the river from downtown Copenhagen. An open studio with tall ceilings and expansive windows, it’s described as “Boheme New Yorker style” on Airbnb. As I wandered across Copenhagen from artisanal coffee shop to curated bookstore, I thought about why I want the things I want: an industrial loft apartment, a precisely poured cortado, intimate dinner parties —€” all things that show up in Kinfolk.

I learned these aspirations through magazines, novels, television shows, and the tastes of my friends. Lined up, they seem like the punchline of a joke at my own expense, the reduction of an identity to a few arbitrary objects, and yet I feel an unjustifiable loyalty to them as mine.

I stop in Atelier September, a cafe and furniture boutique in a stately old storefront. With soft lighting, mid-century modern designs, and marble countertops, it exudes characteristically Danish hygge, the trendy term for coziness. But my mind kept wandering back to Kinfolk, which had become a kind of scrim warping everything in its own image.

From a beatific barista I order avocado toast, a culinary trope of the magazine’s audience. It had a local twist, the avocado shellacked like fish scales on dark Danish rye bread, and tasted transcendentally good. Maybe it was the jet lag, but bathed in the mild light of the gray day falling on the marble, I momentarily felt like a better person, or at least more like myself. Then I Instagrammed my cappuccino and it shot past 30 likes, a personal hit.

A lifestyle is made up of a shared vernacular. My Instagram was so popular because my friends recognized a quiet coffee in a foreign city as a badge of the lifestyle that we aspire to. Perhaps these days we demonstrate our mutual recognition by exchanging likes rather than buying magazine subscriptions. Aspiration is mediated by digital technology rather than print. We model our lifestyle goals in Instagram photos because the medium is so accessible. We can publicly participate in our chosen lifestyles all the time, constantly signaling our belonging and getting affirmation in return, creating our own communities rather than waiting for the directions of an editor.

This is ultimately why Kinfolk worked so well. It created a lifestyle with familiar, do-it-yourself tokens —€” the unfinished wood tables and mason jars and dinner parties —€” fit for a world in recession, and subsumed them within an iconic visual style that was equally easy to participate in through social media. Kinfolk also came into existence just as we started using platforms like Instagram aspirationally, translating the aesthetics of the glossy print page onto the even glossier screen and making them our own in the process. As Williams admits, he lost control of what “Kinfolk” communicated. It means more to people as a label than as a substantive movement or even a magazine.

Photo by Anders Schønnemann for Racked

The #Kinfolk community is united less by particular ideas about how to live than a superficial visual style. It enforces monotony rather than embracing differences of identity. The same emblems of aspiration can now be found in Brooklyn or Copenhagen as easily as Tokyo, Lisbon, London, or Istanbul, and Kinfolk is always there to provide them, piggybacking on the meme it has become.

The challenge that Williams and Ouur face is how to reclaim an image of self-affirming authenticity when the perspective that once made them unique is now universal. It’s the hipster paradox: you can’t be both nonconformist and part of a massive, global group.

“Convergence is possible only at the price of shedding identity,” architect Rem Koolhaas wrote in his 1995 book, The Generic City. “Identity is like a mousetrap in which more and more mice have to share the original bait, and which, on closer inspection, may have been empty for centuries.”


There’s a kind of schadenfreude to watching the meaning drain from a lifestyle aesthetic, in the fading relevance of latte art and avocado toast. Lifestyle is like high fashion —€” you can only chase it in its wake, catching fleeting moments. I started to wonder what Williams himself was chasing, so I met him again one night at his office.

The editor doesn’t live an immaculate Kinfolk life. Williams watches Seinfeld at home after work and follows along with the latest potboiler TV: The Good Wife, The Black List. Rather than novels, he reads the usual business books on entrepreneurship, leadership, and running a creative team. But he still has to determine how Ouur will direct the Kinfolk-y aspirations of its audience, present and future. The vision of a lifestyle must constantly be refined, made to appear effortless, timely, authentic, and unaware of its own artificiality. To better explain his goals, Williams shared a moment of clarity he had experienced earlier that day.

Joni Mitchell

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/10/09/joni-mitchells-openhearted-heroism 

All she needed was her lyrics, preternaturally analytic, wry, and shrewd; her chords, largely self-invented, a kind of calligraphy of the moods; and her voice, which modulates from patter to rue to rhapsody in a single phrase. In concert, she sometimes trained her attention on a single listener in the front row, casting the stranger as the vivid “you” of a song who in real life may have been Sam Shepard, James Taylor, or Leonard Cohen. The best pop music is often preening and shamanic.

This photo of a Danish kitchen appears in The Kinfolk Home. Photo

excerpts from  https://the-shooting-star.com/2013/08/01/10-life-lessons-from-2-years-of-travelling/

We take life too seriously.Most of us have been brought up and set in such moulds of what our life should look like by the time we’re thirty, that we forget it’s okay to mess up and live a little. Meeting people both in my own backyard and halfway across the world made me realize that you don’t always have to be running and aspiring for something more. That more than a steady job, a posh apartment, a promotion, a life partner, or even a to-do list, it’s more fulfilling to have a life that you’ve thoroughly enjoyed.

Freedom is underrated.

At some point after I quit my job (Read: The Story of How I Quit My Job to Travel) and gave up any semblance of a regular schedule, I started to wonder why so many people, my family included, couldn’t appreciate the sense of freedom I felt everyday. Then I met a fisherman in Mauritius who chose not to work in a factory for more money like his friends, because he loved the sea and could choose not to work on some days and still feed his family (Read: What a Fisherman Taught Me About Paradise). It was his philosophy that made me more sure of mine.

Possessions are overrated.While moving to Delhi from Singapore two years ago, I had accumulated a few suitcases worth of stuff, from six years of living there. I decided to get rid of most of it, though not without the gnawing feeling that I was going to miss it. The truth? A month from then, I didn’t even remember what stuff I had left behind. I’m in the process of instituting a big change in my life after August, and this time I’ll be more than happy to get rid of the things I certainly don’t need.

Karma can bitch-slap you.You know when you go all out to help a friend and then they brutally backstab you? That’s kind of what karma has done to me recently. I won’t go into details, but I think I’ve learnt my lesson right here in the travel industry. You can either do the right thing or be politically correct, and while both have their consequences, it’s not true that doing the right thing can’t screw you over. That’s just how life is.

Strangers are kind.I’ve trashed all those horror stories that end with the lesson, don’t talk to strangers. If I had a penny for every time I’ve been overwhelmed with the kindness of a stranger on my travels, I’d be a millionaire. Families with so little in small villages in India have shared their meals and life stories with me. People in Turkey opened up their homes and hearts to this stranger from Hindistan (Read: So Long, Turkey). The hospitality of an Aussie expat in Mauritius and a French-Mauritian couple in Rodrigues blew me over. And I haven’t yet experienced anything close to the warmth of the Bahraini people (Read: Land of a Thousand Friends). So trust your gut, but let strangers show you what a kind world we live in.

Happiness is not the goal.I always thought that the leap of faith I took two years ago, to live and travel on my own terms, would take me closer to the illusive feeling of happiness. And it has. But happiness is such a fleeting feeling. Happiness for me was a drunk man on a lonely road in Sri Lanka stopping and shining the torch in our direction, till we found our way back to our guesthouse. Happiness was walking into a bakery in Turkey to ask for directions, and having the owner pull out his truck to give me a ride. The memories of these moments last, but happiness itself doesn’t. Recently a friend told me, we’re not people who can be happy. We’re just drifters. It’s true.

Boxes , Labels and Qs

https://www.buzzfeed.com/genamourbarrett/things-single-girls-are-tired-of-hearing?utm_term=.rv6g244aAO#.omrBwLLDY2

http://viralstories.in/breaking-44-typical-indian-stereotypes-stop-presuming-everything/

 

You literally asked me this question two weeks ago. Aren't you tired of asking yet?

Miramax Films / Via giphy.com

You literally asked me this question two weeks ago. Aren’t you tired of asking yet?

. “Isn’t there someone that you at least like?”

Sorry to disappoint.

Logo / Via nesoxochi.tumblr.com

Sorry to disappoint.

. “Why are you still single?”

Do I have to have a special reason? It just is what it is.

Fox Searchlight Pictures / Via anamorphosis-and-isolate.tumblr.com

Do I have to have a special reason? It just is what it is.

. “I know you’re probably looking for a partner, but I just want to be friends.”

Just because I'm single doesn't mean I want to date you. Please get over yourself.

ABC / Via giphy.com

. “You need to stop being so picky.”

Bravo / Via giphy.com

. “Maybe you need to change your attitude.”

Via giphy.com

9. “Stop looking for love and let love come to you!”

Life-changing advice. Never heard that before, thank you.

Bravo / Via giphy.com

Life-changing advice. Never heard that before, thank you.

. “When are you going to get married?”

NBC / Via giphy.com

. “What about kids? Are kids on the cards any time soon?”

What? No. Stop asking that.

Citytv / Via giphy.com

What? No. Stop asking that.

. “Time is running out, you know.”

Bravo / Via giphy.com

. “How long have you actually been single for?”

Does it matter?

VH1 / Via giphy.com

Does it matter?

. “Don’t you get lonely? I’d get so bored if I was single.”

That could be more because you have a boring life than the fact you have a partner, but cool.

Fox / Via giphy.com

That could be more because you have a boring life than the fact you have a partner, but cool.

 “You should start a new hobby to meet people.”

NBC / Via fiercegifs.tumblr.com

. “You need to put yourself out there!”

Bravo / Via giphy.com

. “If you’re not careful, you’ll end up as a crazy cat lady.”

GREAT! I LOVE CATS. They're so fluffy and don't ask stupid questions.

Bravo / Via giphy.com

GREAT! I LOVE CATS. They’re so fluffy and don’t ask stupid questions.

. “I know someone I can set you up with!”

Lord no. Please, no. I'm fine.

ABC / Via giphy.com

Lord no. Please, no. I’m fine.

 “You should try Tinder/OkCupid/Match.com. Have you tried them? Have you?”

I have received enough dick pics to tell you that yes indeed I have tried them, thanks. Not for me.

NBC / Via giphy.com

. “There’s plenty of fish in the sea! Speaking of fish, have you joined Plenty of Fish yet?”

Arghhhfsohgehgughehu, go away.

Oxygen / Via giphy.com

Arghhhfsohgehgughehu, go away.

. “I think it’s so great you’re so comfortable with being on your own.”

Yeah, thanks, I'm a great inspiration to all of womankind. *rolls eyes*

FOX / Via giphy.com

Yeah, thanks, I’m a great inspiration to all of womankind. *rolls eyes*

 “Why do girls make such a big fuss over getting a partner anyway?”

Maybe it's because people like you keep asking them when they're going to get one? Maybe.

Via giphy.com

Maybe it’s because people like you keep asking them when they’re going to get one? Maybe.

 

    . Because it’s not the dress code here..

    stereotype 1

     

    2. Because there are actually people who are truly self-made..

    stereotype 4

     

    3. Because it doesn’t require a marriage certificate…

    stereotype 12

     

    5. Because it’s travelling a she likes not necessarily binging.

    stereotype 7

     

    6. Because they are as much a part of this country as you and me.

    stereotype 21

     

    7. Because reading could be loved by anyone..

    stereotype 27

     

    8. Because language is only a medium of communication..

    stereotype 32

     

    9. Because they are not the descendants of Jaadu

    stereotype 36

     

    10. Because even we aren’t Italian and still love pizza…

    stereotype 45

     

    11. Because, even Star City is a bike….

    stereotype 26

     

    12. Because being a Punjabi doesn’t stand for Patiala pegs..

    stereotype 44

     

    13. Because a good art can never remain hidden…

    stereotype 48

     

    14. Because ek ladka aur ek ladki sirf dost nahin ho sakte was just a dialogue from a movie….

    stereotype 50

     

    15. Because no doubt girls like to shop but they too like to be self-dependent just as you guys….

    stereotype 22

     

    16. Because fashion is just about defining yourself… Not your definition.

    stereotype 40

     

    17. Because even we are Indians and it’s not our mother tongue either…

    stereotype 15

     

    18. Because even they need to reach for work on time…

    stereotype 17

     

    19. Because being Mother India doesn’t require running about the trees dancing…

    stereotype

     

    20. Because doing what you love doesn’t alter your gender…

    stereotype 35

     

    21. Because the RTO didn’t deny license me on the grounds that I’m a female…

    stereotype 33

     

    22. Because poems need a conscious mind…

    stereotype 41

     

    23. Because the canteen also offers other things…

    stereotype 38

     

    24. Because you always have a choice to move elsewhere…

    stereotype

     

     

    . Because respecting women isn’t community specific…

    stereotype

     

    27. Because sooti saree is not the precondition to helping the society…

    stereotype

     

    28. Because even she filled ‘good handwriting’ books in school…

    stereotype

     

    29. Because not all have a questionable taste in music…

    stereotype

     

     Because it’s neither fair not lovely to be a racist….

     

    stereotype

     

     Because no degree can force you to not take up your dreams…

    stereotype

     

    32. Because your taste buds do not know which state you belong to…

    stereotype

     

     Because you only marry once and with your own species…

    stereotype

     

    . Because if you ever passed your primary school you would know Madrasi is just for Tamil Nadu residents; and that’s just one of the states from South India…

    stereotype

     

    . Because Delhi is not an another name for Sick Perverts Club…

    stereotype

     

    Because it gets paid to be skilled….

    stereotype

     

     Because what people tend to confuse modernism to with short skirts is just westernisation….

    stereotype

     

    . Because I could actually uproot a hand-pump and blown your head way…

    stereotype

     

    . Because all love comfort over style…it’s not just a phrase…

    stereotype

     

    41. Because loving blue doesn’t make you a lesbian….

    stereotype

     

    42. Because 10 rupaiye ke liye se jhik jhik even I don’t like….

    stereotype

     

    43. Because it doesn’t cost anything to make someone laugh either…

    stereotype

     

     Because red is also the colour of danger…

    stereotype

    Art Deco design ideas

    http://butdoesitfloat.com/    – collage , typography , paintings etc.

    http://www.trendey.com/scandi-retro –     rustic / retro stuff

    swedish-spring2

    http://anindiansummer-design.blogspot.in –  This site’s got some seriously gr8 eclectic eye candy

    http://business.time.com/2013/04/17/dont-multitask-your-brain-will-thank-you/

    The ability to juggle work is a standard job requirement.

    Researchers have another name for this supposedly desirable skill, however: chronic multitasking.

    If this sounds more like an affliction than a resumé booster, that’s because research has shown again and again that the human mind isn’t meant to multitask. Even worse, research shows that multitasking can have long-term harmful effects on brain function.

    In a 2009 study, Stanford researcher Clifford Nass challenged http://www.coroflot.com/alankar_vishal/InfoGraphics262 college students to complete experiments that involved switching among tasks, filtering irrelevant information, and using working memory. Nass and his colleagues expected that frequent multitaskers would outperform nonmultitaskers on at least some of these activities.

    They found the opposite: Chronic multitaskers were abysmal at all three tasks. The scariest part: Only one of the experiments actually involved multitasking, signaling to Nass that even when they focus on a single activity, frequent multitaskers use their brains less effectively.

    https://i0.wp.com/24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lvnx8g23i81qzg7rxo1_400.jpg

    Multitasking is a weakness, not a strength. In 2010, a study by neuroscientists at the French medical research agency Inserm showed that when people focus on two tasks simultaneously, each side of the brain tackles a different task.

    This suggests a two-task limit on what the human brain can handle. Taking on more tasks increases the likelihood of errors, so Nass suggests what he calls the 20-minute rule. Rather than switching tasks from minute to minute, dedicate a 20-minute chunk of time to a single task, then switch to the next one.

    His second tip: “Don’t be a sucker for email.” The average professional spends about 23 percent of the day emailing, studies show. Inspired by that statistic, Gloria Mark of the University of California, Irvine, and her colleague Stephen Voida infiltrated an office, cut 13 employees off from email for five days, strapped heart monitors to their chests, and tracked their computer use. Not surprisingly, the employees were less stressed when cut off from email. They focused on one task for longer periods of time and switched screens less often, thereby minimizing multitasking.

    Mark and Voida encourage business owners and their employees to check emails a few scheduled times per day and turn email notifications off the rest of the time. Adds Voida: “Quick questions are often better asked face to face or by phone, where they don’t add to the huge amount of email we’re already dealing with.”

    LINKS

    • http://www.youthkiawaaz.com/       India’s largest online and mobile platform for young people to talk about issues of importance and seek action on them.  Youth Ki Awaaz also runs  India’s first and only mobile platform for youth opinions that needs no smart phones or apps, goes beyond internet penetration and empowers people to share their opinions, and also take action by simply calling up 09310952952 and recording their opinions or report issues within 60 seconds.
    • http://www.selfgrowth.com/              Articles on  Self Improvement
    • http://laughingsquid.com/                 Found it somewhat similar to twistedsifter.com – blog featuring interesting art, culture & technology………
    • http://www.designsponge.com/       Design blog featuring DIY tips , weekly design obsessions , artists , textile designers etc. nice pics

    http://www.youthkiawaaz.com/2013/04/heres-how-a-girl-decided-to-walk-out-of-school-and-enter-the-5th-space-to-discover-real-learning/

    Walking out’ essentially is being able to critically examining the conventions of society and its institutions, and rejecting those that are oppressive or discriminating. It is also about ‘walking on’ to create more egalitarian and inclusive alternatives, be that in relationships, learning, or living.

    …………..to ‘walk out’ of the two major systems of oppression in India – patriarchy and caste, and ‘walk on’ to reclaim ‘family’ as a group of individuals connected by love, trust, and shared values rather than a common-named unit headed by a patriarch male.

     

    This ‘walking out’ and ‘walking on’ extends to the other spaces too. In school, I was a ‘model’ student who scored good marks. But there came a point where I couldn’t help wondering what the point was to study all these subjects only for an examination, after which they would be forgotten. My father is a graduate in B.Sc Statistics but couldn’t help me in my calculations of the mean, median and mode! (Not doubting his intelligence!) To delve deeper into these questions, my parents and I decided that I would ‘walk-out’ (rather than ‘drop-out’) of school and begin my own journey of discovery and learning. In school, I was a passive receiver and memorizer of textbook knowledge. Out of school, I could take full responsibility of my learning, and thus, of my life!

     

    What does taking ownership of one’s learning entail? In school, some higher authority who doesn’t even know me, decides what I should study and when I have studied ‘enough’ to be qualified with a certificate. But once I decide to take my learning into my own hands, I decide WHAT I want to learn, HOW I want to learn it and from WHOM. And I don’t need a degree or certificate to validate that I have learnt ‘enough’, as my learning will organically manifest in my work, in my life, and in who I am.

     

    Taking ownership also means getting to know ourselves first, and learning according to our needs and contexts. It starts by asking a simple question, “What is it that I really care about?” It might be an idea, an art, or a skill, even a question we want to find the answer to. It might not be one thing, might be ten. Start from there. I believe all of us have the potential to do something great, as long as we’re truly passionate about it. Like Rancho says in 3 idiots, “Kamyabi ke peeche mat bhago. Kabil bano… Phir kamyabi to sali jhak maar ke peeche bhagegi.” (Don’t run after success, strive for excellence in whatever you do. Success will follow.)

     

    Another important realization for me during the process of reclaiming my learning, which is also known as ‘self-designed learning,’ by the way, has been that everything is interconnected. Hence, we are not isolated individuals in this process but rather parts of a greater ‘self’ – the community, society, and the environment. Along with exploring and understanding ourselves then, another important aspect of learning is exploring and understanding the world – this larger self – and contextualizing our learning according to its needs.

    pakizah:Bombay, India1996Steve McCurry

     

    Let me share a small story about my inner and outer journey of learning. I had gone to stay in a remote village in the forests of the Gadchiroli district in Eastern Maharashtra, as part of a youth social exposure programme that I was participating in. On the last day of my visit, I witnessed an act of domestic violence in the family I was staying with, which left me feeling utterly shocked and helpless. As I said, I had been raised in a gender non-discriminatory household and had never fully comprehended the exploitation that women in realities other than mine had to face. I realised that I was a woman too, and had I been born in different circumstances than my own, I, too, would have been subjected to this kind of oppression and violence just by virtue of being born with a female body. Trying to deal with and overcome this newly articulated fear, I resolved to learn about and contribute to a movement that was making an effort to change this attitude of discrimination and violence against women. And this too, started from looking within.

     

    Beginning with our names, patriarchy and other forms of oppression have seeped into the core of our identities and relationships. My endeavour is to ‘walk out’ of them, and invite others to ‘walk on’ along with me.

     

    Sustainable design

    Pergola designs http://www.energyproductsanddesign.com/blog/tag/pergola/

    Outdoor Great Room - Pergola

    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-propertyplus/design-differently/article4563151.ece

    A group of visionary civil engineers at the Indian Institute of Engineers, Bangalore, initiated ASTRA, abbreviation for Application of Science and Technology for Rural Areas. This simple motto led to pioneering research on mud walls, arch roofs, vaults and domes, besides relooking at vernacular designs for modern applications with their work still continuing under the name Gram Vidya.

    The unique settlement at Auroville, though started with the spiritual blessings of The Mother, turned out be a world laboratory on alternative designs and constructions. A heaven for students and learners, people keen on exploring cost-effective, eco-friendly and energy-efficient models even today flock to Auroville. The Energy and Resource Institute or TERI has commissioned, collated and contributed a wealth of information towards sustainable buildings.

    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-propertyplus/building-with-a-view/article4565880.ece

    When he discovered Auroville in 1992, he settled down and began his studio. Here, he converges contemporary living with vernacular principles of design, mainly the climatic, cultural and socio-economic characters of architecture.

    Rooted in tradition:The ‘Auromodele’ aims at building for ‘community living’ and breaks the conventional mould of ‘four walls and a roof’

    Jadeja also believes that Indian design supports minimalism in many ways, “I see minimalism in architecture as being minimal use of energy, minimal impact on environment, minimal intrusion on the social, aesthetical and cultural identity of the place.

    To understand the deeper meaning of minimalism in architecture, architects need to create space for crafts, culture and identity and arrive at a more contemporary language for traditions. “There are positive signs in textile design, films, fashion, and furniture in different parts of the world. In India, I am still waiting for a big movement in architecture,” says Jadeja.

    http://www.permaculture.org/nm/index.php/site/index/ –   Permaculture is an ecological design system for sustainability in all aspects of human endeavor. It teaches us how build natural homes, grow our own food, restore diminished landscapes and ecosystems, catch rainwater, build communities and much more.

    Paper products made out of elephant and rhinoceros excreta

    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/saving-the-planet-with-poo/article4493446.ece  –  ……………..“It was our intention to make this a completely eco-friendly product. The paper is made by mixing the dung with other waste products like hosiery rags. The paper is organic and acid-free. It further helps in the conservation of two endangered species — the Greater One Horned Rhino and the Asian Elephant. It is also wood-free, so it helps save trees. The paper is recyclable and biodegradable, and no chemicals harmful to the environment are used in making the paper. Finally, no toxic waste is generated.”

    http://frenchbydesign.blogspot.in/2013/03/oh-la-la-jaime.html

    E from brainpickings

    • http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/09/03/anais-nin-on-emotion-and-writing/         Permit yourself to flow and overflow, allow for the rise in temperature, all the expansions and intensifications. Something is always born of excess: great art was born of great terrors, great loneliness, great inhibitions, instabilities, and it always balances them. If it seems to you that I move in a world of certitudes, you, par contre, must benefit from the great privilege of youth, which is that you move in a world of mysteries. But both must be ruled by faith.

    https://i2.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/anaisnindiary4.jpg

    •  http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/11/08/anais-nin-unfamiliar/        Educators do all in their power to prepare you to enjoy reading after college. It is right that you should read according to your temperament, occupations, hobbies, and vocations. But it is a sign of great inner insecurity to be hostile to the unfamiliar, unwilling to explore the unfamiliar. In science, we respect the research worker. In literature, we should not always read the books blessed by the majority. This trend is reflected in such absurd announcements as “the death of the novel,” “the last of the romantics,” “the last of the Bohemians,” when we know that these are continuous trends which evolve and merely change form. The suppression of inner patterns in favor of patterns created by society is dangerous to us. Artistic revolt, innovation, experiment should not be met with hostility. They may disturb an established order or an artificial conventionality, but they may rescue us from death in life, from robot life, from boredom, from loss of the self, from enslavement.

    •    http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/09/24/anais-nin-global-village/  –    on the Dangers of the Internet (1946)    Even more interesting than the striking similarity between what Nin admonishes against and the present dynamics of the internet is the fact that she essentially describes Marshall McLuhan’s seminal concept of the global village… a decade and a half before he coined it.

      The secret of a full life is to live and relate to others as if they might not be there tomorrow, as if you might not be there tomorrow. It eliminates the vice of procrastination, the sin of postponement, failed communications, failed communions. This thought has made me more and more attentive to all encounters. meetings, introductions, which might contain the seed of depth that might be carelessly overlooked. This feeling has become a rarity, and rarer every day now that we have reached a hastier and more superficial rhythm, now that we believe we are in touch with a greater amount of people, more people, more countries. This is the illusion which might cheat us of being in touch deeply with the one breathing next to us. The dangerous time when mechanical voices, radios, telephones, take the place of human intimacies, and the concept of being in touch with millions brings a greater and greater poverty in intimacy and human vision.

    • http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/12/14/how-to-avoid-work/No matter what your age or condition or experience, the sooner you find out what you really want to do and do it better, for that’s the only way anyone can avoid work.
    • http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/08/01/anais-nin-journals-paris-vs-new-york/                          Relationships seem impersonal and everyone conceals his secret life, whereas in Paris it was the exciting substance of our talks, intimate revelations and sharing of experience. People’s last concern is with intimacy. No attention is given to friendship and its development. Nothing is done to soften the harshness of life itself. There is much talk about the ‘world,’ about millions, groups, but no warmth between human beings. They persecute subjectivity, which is a sense of inner life; an individual’s concern with growth and self-development is frowned upon. The ivory tower of the artist may be the only stronghold left for human values, cultural treasures, man’s cult of beauty.

    architecture and other links

    http://www.fincabellavista.com/        –  a residential treehouse community in its formative years in the south Pacific coastal region of Costa Rica

    http://www.fincabellavista.com/learn-conserve/the-bellavista-initiative/ – assist communities throughout Latin America in regenerating rainforest assets and restoring native habitats to encourage healthier lifestyles, economies and opportunities. applying remedies to some of the most pressing ecological and social maladies impacting the Southern Zone of Costa Rica ………….

    Our mission is to assist communities throughout Latin America in regenerating rainforest assets and restoring native habitats to encourage healthier lifestyles, economies and opportunities.

    http://www.openculture.com    – Free educational media , interesting articles/videos  on psychology literature etc.

    http://www.dumblittleman.com/

    http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/08/20/how-to-read-a-poem-edward-hirsch/

    gr8  vintage site – http://warymeyers.blogspot.in/search/label/Interiors

    http://anthologymag.com/blog3/2012/04/25/wary-meyers/ https://excerptsandm.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/img_22921.jpg

    another gud collection –   http://anthologymag.com/blog3/tag/interiors/

    https://i1.wp.com/anthologymag.com/blog3/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/KK3.jpg

    retro

    http://warymeyers.blogspot.in/2013/03/knoll-londons-black-peter-playing-cards.html

     http://www.galinsky.com/buildings/experimentalhouse/   –   Alvar Aalto

      http://the189.com/         –  site featuring architects – classic and contemporary ……..found most of the designs  representing the  funcionalist ideology

    https://i1.wp.com/the189.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Louis-Kahn-Visual-Archive-by-Naquib-Hossain-1.jpg

    Perfumes Inspired by Dead Writers

    http://bookriot.com/2013/01/29/dead-writers-perfume/

    Perfumes Inspired by Dead Writers –

    a few………..

    Jane Austen: Darjeeling tea, snowdrops and pansies (flowers from her garden), meadow grass

    Dorothy Parker: Whiskey sour, vanilla, mandarin, white musk

    the Bronte Sisters: Heather, sea air, vetiver, primrose, black tea

    Louisa May Alcott: Fir tree, red currant, blood orange, coffee beans

    Tolstoy: Vodka, musk, black tea, black peppercorn, cedar

    Dickens: Cloves, tobacco, patchouli, brandy water, river water

    what about agatha christie ?????????????????????         ( ……. or rand or doyle or maugham…………etc.etc ) , but gud to see austen and the bronte sis’ s in 1 place

    id-links

    redsplash.jpg