Tag Archive: fav


quotes , solitude

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“I believe that introversion is my greatest strength. I have such a strong inner life that I’m never bored and only occasionally lonely. No matter what mayhem is happening around me, I know I can always turn inward.”Susan Cain

In many shamanic societies, if you came to a medicine person complaining of being disheartened, dispirited, or depressed, they would ask one of four questions: When did you stop dancing? When did you stop singing? When did you stop being enchanted by stories? When did you stop finding comfort in the sweet territory of silence?” – Gabrielle Roth

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q

  

                        “Follow your pattern, in humility-and hope.”

The Hindu : Arts / Books : One for the bookseller.

Colin Franklin’s memoir, Obsessions and Confessions of a Book Life (published jointly by Oak Knoll Press, The Book of Kells, Bernard Quartich Limited, 2012) written in his 89th year is a book for booksellers. A bibliophile will take deep pleasure in it, but a bookseller will feel a closer kinship and resonance with Franklin’s accurate, precise, and stylish recollection of transactions between dealer and collector. I was charmed by Franklin’s diffidence; can a rare book dealer even afford to be as diffident and shy today? Did his diffidence belong to that time — those days — or does it stem from him being a scholar-book dealer? The minutiae of bookselling made him awkward.

He was often embarrassed about selling, asking prices or quoting them; even thinking of referring to someone as customer made him uncomfortable. Franklin thinks catalogues are self-advertisements and, after doing about some eight of them, he stopped noting that they felt like ‘an infinitely vulgar form of self offering’. Instead he exhibited at international antiquarian book fairs and talks of how they are composed of invariably painful moments, inescapable boredom, some discoveries and surprises — best of all, at end of day, dining out with other booksellers and gossiping.

‘No bookseller is free of the fear that he will never sell another book’.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/cancer-cuisine/article4373998.ece

http://www.thehindu.com/life-and-style/leisure/the-faces-that-make-the-fte/article4360253.eceHappy consumers are not the only ones that look forward to Numaish. For some Hyderabadis it is less a shopper’s paradise and more a place of vocation; Zeenab Annez speaks to the groups of people who make Numaish safe and enjoyable to the visitors-    …..Whether in fashion, food, home décor or electronics, Numaish has always been up to date with the latest trends in the market but there is one thing that stubbornly refuses to change according to consumer taste: the music. As radio announcer Rashid aptly puts in “You will not hear any ‘Munni badnaam hui’ here,” and he is right. As one walks through the stalls, shopkeepers and sales boys lip-sync involuntarily to the catchy tunes they have been hearing for the past few weeks. Spend enough time there and you will find yourself doing the same.  The man in charge, Ajay Jaswal of Ajay Sounds boasts of a large collection of old Hindi classics.

The hopeless human predicament

 

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-sundaymagazine/the-hopeless-human-predicament/article4324615.ece

Nothing much is happening in their wretched lives. “Nothing happens, nobody comes, nobody goes, it’s awful.” All they can do is to wait with anxiety and trepidation the arrival of Godot.

As Vladimir states: “But that is not the question. Why are we here; that is the question. And we are blessed in this, that we happen to know the answer. Yes, in this immense confusion one thing alone is clear. We are waiting for Godot to come.”

So the two men, doomed to one another’s company in desolate surroundings, pass time bantering and bickering, singing and reminiscing, laughing and crying to relieve the monotony of their endless ‘wait’. They voice profound metaphysical questions interspersed with small talk. Their emotions change in quick succession, as if to reveal the contradictions that the human self is steeped in. Vladimir and Estragon desperately need one another in order to avoid living a life of loneliness and alienation. “Didi” and “Gogo” — their nicknames — demonstrate the intimacy of their relationship. Yet, every now and then they feel compelled to leave one another.

Estragon: Wait! (He moves away from Vladimir.) I sometimes wonder if we wouldn’t have been better off alone, each one for himself. (He crosses the stage and sits down on the mound.) We weren’t made for the same road.

Vladimir: (without anger) It’s not certain.

Estragon: No, nothing

The pathos in Didi and Gogo’s need for each other and the anguish in their desire to escape their plight are palpable just as the absurdity in the situation of pointless waiting is evident. They do not know who Godot is. They are neither sure about the time nor the place of their appointment. They do not even know what will happen if they stopped waiting. Lack of this basic knowledge makes them powerless and insignificant. The tramps cannot but wait for Godot.

Ironically, the much-awaited Godot is never ever going to arrive.

Each day is a return to the beginning and each day passes in circuitous conversation.

Will they forever keep circling? Will they ever find closure? Perhaps not, because the universe that Beckett presents before us is devoid of design, purpose or care.

The intermingling of absurdist comedy with black humour redeems and lightens the inherently tragic theme. The spectators break out of their self-imposed inertia, rock with the rhythm of the play, pity and fear, laugh and cry. Waiting for Godot encapsulates the human condition brilliantly. It connects with our life and our situation. It seems to echo our deepest fears, confronts us with our naked self and our predicament, our stark loneliness — conditions not imposed by any outsider but by our own selves.

The play ends on that very note of bleak desperation. The unhappy vagrants, their questions unanswered, their hopes dashed, speak the final lines “Well? Shall we go?” Estragon answers, “Yes, let’s go,” but neither moves. The curtain falls over their immobility, over their inner paralysis.

I have spent two and a half hours balanced on a gossamer thread stretched between tension and excitement, astonishment and pure wonder. I have just witnessed a dramatic masterpiece, a timeless tale — a philosophical quest that is universal and eternal. I am out of the play but still in the play, haunted by the hopelessness of the human predicament.

As I walk by the meandering Liffey and the quays in downtown Dublin in the cool December breeze, I feel humbled by my own insignificance and an overwhelming sense of waiting for something undefinable in ‘the cosmic waiting room’.

music

contd. from aug 2011…………

http://kathrynvercillo.hubpages.com/hub/10-Ways-to-Calm-Down-When-Anxiety-Strikes

http://balajipalamadai.blogspot.in/2010/06/phalaharini-kali-puja.html

retro /art deco design

http://www.beinteriordecorator.com/interior-design-lords-south-beach-hotel-fabulous-and-colourful-design/

he Cha Cha Rooster bar offers a glamorous setting for cocktails, the interiors are chic and feature custom-designed graphics the lobby lounge is a place where one can enjoy the eclectic mix of architecture and design

return to this inspirational collection of spaces. The exquisite interiors of the hotel express a strong desire to travel beautifully and be surrounded by colours and a cheerful atmosphere

outdoor space acts as the social hub of the house.

Photography by Greg Richardson

design minimalist dining room and kitchen with modern furnituredesign minimalist dining room and kitchen with modern furniture

interior design dining room and living room in one room with modern furnitureinterior design dining room and living room in one room with modern furniture

interior design minimalist a living room with modern sofainterior design minimalist a living room with modern sofa

the grand double storey outdoor space acts as the social hub of the house

urniture give a refreshing feeling. interior design living room with wooden roof and modern furniture in bright colors

travel beautifully and be surrounded by colours and a cheerful atmosphere interior design bedroom with spirited and cheerful design , perfect for vacations

RKMATH

EVENT –  RKMATH- 26 Apr 12 –  was asked to get INTD

 

quotes

http://www.thehindu.com/life-and-style/metroplus/article3335809.ece   Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

“Adversity is like a strong wind. I don’t mean just that it holds us back from places we might otherwise go. It also tears away from us all but the things that cannot be torn, so that afterward we see ourselves as we really are, and not merely as we might like to be.”
Arthur Golden, Memoirs of a Geisha

http://agoldoffish.wordpress.com/criminal-minds-opening-and-closing-quotes/

http://www.criminalmindsfanwiki.com/page/Season+7+Quotes

For the man sound in body and serene of mind there is no such thing as bad weather, every sky has its beauty, and storms which whip the blood do but make it pulse more vigorously.”  George Gissing.

The author François de la Rochefoucauld wrote, “We are so accustomed to disguise ourselves to others that in the end we become disguised to ourselves.”

musings

shud try  espresso -Tiramisu  in venice , saw in rhodes across italy. harry’s bar-venice

clouds , fav

https://i1.wp.com/farm8.staticflickr.com/7172/6707713117_89982748a4.jpg

IMG0066B

clouds in Bhubaneshwar

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alicepopkorn/6707713117/in/photostream/                       IMG0112B

NPA passing out parade

NPA passing out parade

yoga

http://www.bradpriddy.com/yoga/sequen.htmSequencing of asanas

http://anamikas.hubpages.com/hub/Yogic-Exercises-for-Diseases-Health-Conditions

http://www.remedyspot.com/articles/241-yoga-ayurveda-exercise-basis-good-health.html

http://www.yogajournal.com/lifestyle/864

http://www.svaroopayoga.org/contemplation.asp

Certain yogic disciplines are well known since ancient times. If you don’t set yourself to them, you may find them happening quite naturally, including:

  • The 3:30 am wake-up call — meditation is calling your name.
  • Early to bed — ready to go to bed with the sun (or soon after).
  • Simplicity — how much of anything do you really need?
  • Living lightly — matching your food intake to what you need, not what you want; or empty out your purse (or your car).
  • Silence — cultivating inner silence by finding opportunities for outer silence.
  • Going without — giving up comforts and pleasures, even giving up things you consider to be necessities (even when they are not).
  • Generosity — giving time, energy and/or money to those you want to support, but giving more than the easy amount.
  • Doing more — tackling a practice or a project, or holding yourself to a higher standard.

You get nowhere in life without tapas. You cannot complete your education, buy or rent a home, keep a job, grow a garden, raise a child or stay married without tapas. There is a hidden secret in the practice of tapas: the karmic effects. The law of karma says that everything you do has repercussions. When you “pick your poison,” doing tapas in the arena you choose, the benefits extend into every area of your life. This principle is well known in India, where a person will undertake an arduous climb to a holy site so that they can get a good job. It works!

I remember giving things up for Lent when I was a child, a form of tapas. Yogis embark on similar periods of intense practice, perhaps by attending a yoga training or retreat — truly tapas! You can create a similar “intensive” for yourself by tackling a pose you don’t like to do, working on it daily for a month, or perhaps giving up television and doing yoga during that time for a week or a year.

The key is that you decide what you’re going to do. If it’s an easy decision, it probably isn’t really tapas. But if you pick something that is too hard, you might not be able to actually do it. So pick a challenge you know you need, but one that you can actually do. Tell your yoga-buddies, so they can encourage and support you. But I must warn you of one seductive aspect to tapas: When you meet the challenge you’ve set for yourself, you might find that you like it so much that it becomes part of your lifestyle. I used to hate the 3:30 am wake-up call, and now I love it!

http://www.auroville.org/vision/integralyoga.htm

http://observedinbooks.blogspot.in/2008/02/complete-artists-way-by-julia-cameron.html

http://www.yoga-age.com/asanas/prana.html

http://www.thepragmaticyogi.com/2010/07/asana-analysis-reclined-herosupta.html

http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=10856

q

The full force of the human will is hard to measure. It is known, that once we

decide on a course of action with all our heart, little can deter us. This is the

power of commitment.

I stop for a moment and call light to myself.