Tag Archive: buddha


Four Attachments

 

Great Middle Way

amistellaIf you are attached to this body,

you lack understanding.

If you are attached to this world,

you lack renunciation.

If you are attached to personal liberation,

you lack the mind of enlightenment.

If you are attached to views,

you lack peace and clarity.

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Don’t wish to become a future Buddha

Zen Flash

Don’t wish to become a future Buddha;
Your only concern should be,
As thought follows thought,
To avoid clinging to any of them.

~ Dogen ~

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The heart of the path is quite easy

Mindfulness in daily life .

Zen Flash

Don’t think that only sitting with the eyes closed is practice. If you do think this way, then quickly change your thinking. Steady practice is keeping mindful in every posture, whether sitting, walking, standing or lying down.

When coming out of sitting, don’t think that you’re coming out of meditation, but that you are only changing postures. If you reflect in this way, you will have peace. Wherever you are, you will have this attitude of practice with you constantly. You will have a steady awareness within yourself.The heart of the path is quite easy. There’s no need to explain anything at length. Let go of like and dislike and let things be. That’s all that I do in my own practice.

~Ajahn Chah~

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Zen Flash

The essence of love and compassion is understanding, the ability to recognize the physical, material, and psychological suffering of others, to put ourselves "inside the skin" of the other. We "go inside" their body, feelings, and mental formations, and witness for ourselves their suffering. </p><p>Shallow observation as an outsider is not enough to see their suffering. We must become one with the subject of our observation. When we are in contact with another's suffering, a feeling of compassion is born in us. Compassion means, literally, "to suffer with.</p><p>So if we love someone, we should train in being able to listen. By listening with calm and understanding, we can ease the suffering of another person.</p><p>Training is needed in order to love properly; and to be able to give happiness and joy, you must practice DEEP LOOKING directed toward the other person you love. Because if you do not understand this person, you cannot love properly. Understanding is the essence of love. If you cannot understand, you cannot love. That is the message of the Buddha.</p><p>~ Thich Nhat Hanh ~
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The essence of love and compassion is understanding, the ability to recognize the physical, material, and psychological suffering of others, to put ourselves “inside the skin” of the other. We “go inside” their body, feelings, and mental formations, and witness for ourselves their suffering.Shallow observation as an outsider is not enough to see their suffering. We must become one with the subject of our observation. When we are in contact with another’s suffering, a feeling of compassion is born in us. Compassion means, literally, “to suffer with.So if we love someone, we should train in being able to listen. By listening with calm and understanding, we can ease the suffering of another person.

Training is needed in order to love properly; and to be able to give happiness and joy, you must practice DEEP LOOKING directed toward the other person you love. Because if you do not…

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Zen Flash

“Above all, be at ease, be as natural and spacious as possible. Slip quietly out of the noose of your habitual anxious self, release all grasping, and relax into your true nature. Think of your ordinary emotional, thought-ridden self as a block of ice or a slab of butter left out in the sun. If you are feeling hard and cold, let this aggression melt away in the sunlight of your meditation.

— with Bharat Sharma, Disha Taukoorah and Mokone Bone Matli.

Meditation Masters

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Buddhism

http://www.clear-vision.org/schools/students/ages-12-14/four-noble-truths.aspx

Part of the Enlightenment experience of the Buddha was the direct ‘Knowledge and Vision of Things as they Really Are’; he realised the Truth, or the Dharma.

The Four Noble Truths Buddhism begins by addressing suffering because no-one can deny the existence of pain. Simply put, the Four Noble Truths are:

  1. Dukkha – PAIN – physical suffering, psychological pain and existential dissatisfaction.
  2. Samudaya – The ORIGIN of Pain, which is craving.
  3. Nirodha – The CESSATION of Pain, which is achieved by overcoming craving. The Third Noble Truth asserts that man can achieve Enlightenment through his own efforts.
  4. Magga – The WAY to the Cessation of Pain, which is the following of the Noble Eightfold Path.

Other Buddhists might just say that cancer is one of the many difficult things we may have to face in life, which are hard to explain. What matters is how we respond to it.

One person with cancer may be eaten up with bitterness: “Why me? It’s not fair” etc. This is the kind of suffering which comes with aversion – craving for things to be other than the way they are. This person now has two kinds of suffering. Another person with cancer could choose to see their illness as an opportunity for changing lifestyle, making the most of the time they have left, making sure their friendships are in good repair etc. Because they don’t resist the reality of their situation by craving for things to be different, they suffer less emotional and psychological pain.

Of course, many people with any kind of suffering will experience a mixture of these two attitudes.

…………………………….

 

books to read

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/03/21/must-read-books-music-emotion-brain/What Freud has to do with auditory cheesecake, European opera and world peace.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/01/25/must-read-books-happiness/From Plato to Buddha, or what imperfection has to do with the neuroscience of the good life.

i think russell shud hav been added to the list – https://excerptsandm.wordpress.com/2011/05/08/the-conquest-of-happiness-bertrand-russell/

poetry,q – books

Do not look for a sanctuary in anyone except your self.”

                                                                                                          — Siddhārtha Gautama

“I opened a book and in I strode.
Now nobody can find me.
I’ve left my chair, my house, my road,
My town and my world behind me.
I’m wearing the cloak, I’ve slipped on the ring,
I’ve swallowed the magic potion.
I’ve fought with a dragon, dined with a king,
And swam in a bottomless ocean.
I opened a book and made some friends.
I shared their tears and laughter
And followed their roads with its bumps and bends
To the happily ever after.
I finished my book and out I came.
The cloak can no longer hide me.
My chair and my house are just the same,
But I have a book inside me.”

Julia Donaldson

“You need to learn how to select your thoughts just the same way you select your clothes every day. This is a power you can cultivate. If you want to control things in your life so bad, work on the mind. That’s the only thing you should be trying to control.”
Elizabeth Gilbert     http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/11679.Elizabeth_Gilbert

“A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man’s mind can get both provocation and privacy.”  – “A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man’s mind can get both provocation and privacy.”

“To me a good book is like a quiet friend—a friend who’s happy to share thoughts and feelings with you, who’s always there when you need them. Best of all, this friend doesn’t have any secrets. They trust you to understand them. They take you to their innermost places. They share their sensations and emotions—and they let you experience them. Wherever you go and however you feel, they are always by your side. For an hour, a day, a week, or forever, their life becomes yours. Their story is your story. That’s the kind of book I’m trying to write.”  Kevin Brooks

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aseaofquotes  Paul Auster, The Invention of Solitude

“Great books give you a feeling that you miss all day, until you finally get to crawl back inside those pages again.”Kathryn Stockett

“Isn’t it odd how much fatter a book gets when you’ve read it several times? As if something were left between the pages every time you read it. Feelings, thoughts, sounds, smells, and then, when you look at the book again many years later, you find yourself there, too, a slightly younger self, slightly different, as if the book had preserved you like a pressed flower, both strange and familiar.”

“Wear the old coat and buy the new book.”

Austin Phelps
Cornelia Funke

zen

http://zen.thetao.info/do/index.htm   So the monk that was compassionate but never studied, was reborn into wealth without intelligence.  The monk that studied without practicing good works, had insight, but no means of survival.  It is through meditation and compassionate works that we can achieve enlightenment.

http://www.aboutzen.info/read/taonzen.htm – ‘Taoist Emptiness’ is completely different to ‘Buddhism Emptiness’. The Emptiness in the Tao is about restraint, patience, frugality, simplicity, lack of worldly desire etc. These are all good things for Buddhists, but they have nothing whatever to do with Buddhist Emptiness, which is about the inaccuracy of our perceptions of relativity and the fictional objects that are created from that misunderstanding
http://www.dailyzen.com/homey.asp –

We loosely talk of Self-realization, for lack of a better term. But how can one real-ize or make real that which alone is real? All we need to do is to give up our habit of regarding as real that which is unreal. All religious practices are meant solely to help us do this. When we stop regarding the unreal as real, then reality alone will remain, and we will be that.

– Ramana Marharshi (1879-1950)

http://www.dailyzen.com/meditate.asp

parents

Think about honoring your parents this

birthday instead of expecting presents

from them.  They gave you a body, so say

thank you to them for the rebirth you

currently enjoy.

Words of the Buddha

https://excerptsandm.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/tiantanbuddha-1.jpg?w=300

https://i2.wp.com/travelerfolio.com/travelerfolio/photos/tian_tan_buddha_lantau_island_hong_kong.jpg

https://excerptsandm.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/hk11.jpg?w=300