Category: Creativity


E from hlf 2020

Could attend only day 2 of Hyd literature festival 2020 . Lavish buffet for thought…. Paromita , Saba Dewan -new perspectives. Remembering Nabaneeta Dev Sen . Bahar dutt , kalpana Sharma – Rewilding and the need for environmental journalism in the era of bushfires, Delhi smog and massive climate changes. Although , people in urban spaces are also slowly speaking up, there is need for more voices changes for environmental preservation. Paromita and Usha Raman – New digital era – freedoms gained but landscapes lost. We have LOST THE LANGUAGE OF FEELINGS. The blanket of morality…. Is marriage an outdated concept? Stepping beyond binaries into fluidity. Experientiality is most important today ,as shared experiences create lived wisdom. A healthy relationship is not a preset, it should be personalized. Freedom to live his , her or their own life,is its own education. The difficult experiences educate one about what he or she they want in life. Theyyam and kodiyattam – Margi Madhu, Ingu G and Indu Chinta- art as worship , artist as devotee. Landmarks such as schools -memories – tangible heritage. Art forms and cultural traditions are intangible heritages . The kodiyattam artist, Margi Madhu said that practicing for 10 years only made him mimic his guru. He needs 25 years to think, reimagine and develop his own style. Such a dedication is difficult to sustain in contemporary society, where patient audiences are needed to sit through a 2,3 or more hours of performance. Theyyam is not a dance – it is purely ritual – a visual spectacle . The word “Theyyam ” is derived from “daivam ” – God. It refers to both the art and the artist . It is an act of worship, where spectators are more like devotees. Learning is by instruction and imitation. It is a visual spectacle , with ornate hairdressing and face drawing . There are 30 basic patterns which are mixed and matched to create 600 designs. The artist is a mirror in kodiyattam. An optional history of Indian women- Saba Dewan and Paromita Vohra. What is “acceptable” womanhood ? What is “acceptable” creative expression ? Women always set themselves up to impossible ideals, and are constantly in this betwixt and between about wanting to be and should be. Women continue to be defined vis a vis their relationships with men. A woman has a right to be unapologetically herself, without being a flag bearer of anything (i did it or i am this way because i like it , not because so and so happened to me). In an epic the story never ends, it’s ending is only a beginning. Humanising plants is a way of saving them – Nirupa rao -plants of western ghats

E from brainpickings – http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/09/03/how-to-be-alone-school-of-life/

“We live in a society which sees high self-esteem as a proof of well-being, but we do not want to be intimate with this admirable and desirable person.”

If the odds of finding one’s soul mate are so dreadfully dismal and the secret of lasting love is largely a matter of concession, is it any wonder that a growing number of people choose to go solo? The choice of solitude, of active aloneness, has relevance not only to romance but to all human bonds — even Emerson, perhaps the most eloquent champion of friendship in the English language, lived a significant portion of his life in active solitude, the very state that enabled him to produce his enduring essays and journals. And yet that choice is one our culture treats with equal parts apprehension and contempt, particularly in our age of fetishistic connectivity. Hemingway’s famous assertion that solitude is essential for creative work is perhaps so oft-cited precisely because it is so radical and unnerving in its proposition.

A friend recently relayed an illustrative anecdote: One evening during a short retreat in Mexico by herself, she entered the local restaurant and asked to be seated. Upon realizing she was to dine alone, the waitstaff escorted her to the back with a blend of puzzlement and pity, so as not to dilute the resort’s carefully engineered illusory landscape of coupled bliss. (It’s worth noting that this unsettling incident, which is as much about the stigma of being single as about the profound failure to honor the art of being alone, is one women are still far more likely to confront than men; some live to tell about it.)

Solitude, the kind we elect ourselves, is met with judgement and enslaved by stigma. It is also a capacity absolutely essential for a full life.

That paradox is what British author Sara Maitland explores in How to Be Alone .While Maitland lives in a region of Scotland with one of the lowest population densities in Europe, where the nearest supermarket is more than twenty miles away and there is no cell service (pause on that for a moment), she wasn’t always a loner — she grew up in a big, close-knit family as one of six children. It was only when she became transfixed by the notion of silence, the subject of her previous book, that she arrived, obliquely, at solitude. She writes:

I got fascinated by silence; by what happens to the human spirit, to identity and personality when the talking stops, when you press the off button, when you venture out into that enormous emptiness. I was interested in silence as a lost cultural phenomenon, as a thing of beauty and as a space that had been explored and used over and over again by different individuals, for different reasons and with wildly differing results. I began to use my own life as a sort of laboratory to test some ideas and to find out what it felt like. Almost to my surprise, I found I loved silence. It suited me. I got greedy for more. In my hunt for more silence, I found this valley and built a house here, on the ruins of an old shepherd’s cottage.

Maitland’s interest in solitude, however, is somewhat different from that in silence — while private in its origin, it springs from a public-facing concern about the need to address “a serious social and psychological problem around solitude,” a desire to “allay people’s fears and then help them actively enjoy time spent in solitude.” And so she does, posing the central, “slippery” question of this predicament:

Being alone in our present society raises an important question about identity and well-being.

How have we arrived, in the relatively prosperous developed world, at least, at a cultural moment which values autonomy, personal freedom, fulfillment and human rights, and above all individualism, more highly than they have ever been valued before in human history, but at the same time these autonomous, free, self-fulfilling individuals are terrified of being alone with themselves?

We see moral and social conventions as inhibitions on our personal freedoms, and yet we are frightened of anyone who goes away from the crowd and develops “eccentric” habits.

We believe that everyone has a singular personal “voice” and is, moreover, unquestionably creative, but we treat with dark suspicion (at best) anyone who uses one of the most clearly established methods of developing that creativity — solitude.

We think we are unique, special and deserving of happiness, but we are terrified of being alone.[…]We are supposed now to seek our own fulfillment, to act on our feelings, to achieve authenticity and personal happiness — but mysteriously not do it on our own.

Illustration by Maurice Sendak from ‘Open House for Butterflies’ by Ruth Krauss. Click image for more.

Curiously, and importantly, mastering the art of solitude doesn’t make us more antisocial but, to the contrary, better able to connect. By being intimate with our own inner life — that frightening and often foreign landscape that philosopher Martha Nussbaum so eloquently urged us to explore despite our fear — frees us to reach greater, more dimensional intimacy with others. Maitland writes:

Nothing is more destructive of warm relations than the person who endlessly “doesn’t mind.” They do not seem to be a full individual if they have nothing of their own to “bring to the table,” so to speak. This suggests that even those who know that they are best and most fully themselves in relationships (of whatever kind) need a capacity to be alone, and probably at least some occasions to use that ability. If you know who you are and know that you are relating to others because you want to, rather than because you are trapped (unfree), in desperate need and greed, because you fear you will not exist without someone to affirm that fact, then you are free. Some solitude can in fact create better relationships, because they will be freer ones.

This fairly modern attitude, which casts voluntary aloneness as a toxic trifecta of “sad, mad, and bad” — is reinforced via rather dogmatic circular logic that doesn’t afford those who choose solitude the basic dignity of their own choice. Reflecting on the prevalent response of pity — triggered by the “sad” portion of the dogma — Maitland plays out the exasperating impossibility of refuting such social assumptions:

Underlying these attitudes, Maitland argues, is the central driver of fear — fear of those radically different from us, who make choices we don’t necessarily understand. This drives us, in turn, to project our fright onto others, often in the form of anger — a manifestation, at once sad, mad, and bad, of Anaïs Nin’s memorable observation that “it is a sign of great inner insecurity to be hostile to the unfamiliar.”

These persistently reinforced social fears, she notes, have chilling consequences:

If you tell people enough times that they are unhappy, incomplete, possibly insane and definitely selfish there is bound to come a grey morning when they wake up with the beginning of a nasty cold and wonder if they are lonely rather than simply “alone.”

(This crucial difference between aloneness and loneliness, in fact, is not only central to our psychological unease but also enacted even in our bodies — while solitude may be essential for creativity and key to the mythology of genius, loneliness, scientists have found, has deadly physical consequences on our risk for everything from heart disease to dementia.)

But the truth is, the present paradigm is not really working. Despite the intense care and attention lavished on the individual ego; despite over a century of trying to “raise self-esteem” in the peculiar belief that it will simultaneously enhance individuality and create good citizens; despite valiant attempts to consolidate relationships and lower inhibitions; despite intimidating efforts to dragoon the more independent-minded and creative to become “team players”; despite the promises of personal freedom made to us by neoliberalism and the cult of individualism and rights — despite all this, the well seems to be running dry. We are living in a society marked by unhappy children, alienated youth, politically disengaged adults, stultifying consumerism, escalating inequality, deeply scary wobbles in the whole economic system, soaring rates of mental ill-health and a planet so damaged that we may well end up destroying the whole enterprise.

There is no number of friends on Facebook, contacts, connections or financial provision that can guarantee to protect us.

Our cultural ambivalence is also manifested in our chronic bias for extraversion despite growing evidence for the power of introverts. Maitland writes:

At the same time as pursuing this “extrovert ideal,” society gives out an opposite — though more subterranean — message. Most people would still rather be described as sensitive, spiritual, reflective, having rich inner lives and being good listeners than the more extroverted opposites. I think we still admire the life of the intellectual over that of the salesman; of the composer over the performer (which is why pop stars constantly stress that they write their own songs); of the craftsman over the politician; of the solo adventurer over the package tourist… But the kind of unexamined but mixed messages that society offers us in relation to being alone add to the confusion; and confusion strengthens fear.

Among Maitland’s toolkit of “ideas for overturning negative views of solitude and developing a positive sense of aloneness and a true capacity to enjoy it” are the exploration of reverie and the practice of facing the fear. She enumerates the five basic categories of rewards to be reaped from unlearning our culturally conditioned fear of aloneness and learning how to “do” solitude well:

  1. A deeper consciousness of oneself
  2. A deeper atunement to nature
  3. A deeper relationship with the transcendent (the numinous, the divine, the spiritual)
  4. Increased creativity
  5. An increased sense of freedom

    How to Find Yourself   http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/07/17/florence-king-finding-yourself/     

  http://www.spring.org.uk/2014/09/how-to-feel-good-about-your-body-and-worry-less-about-imperfections.php  

http://flavorwire.com/278606/off-the-grid-photos-of-life-in-the-woods/view-all

Sites ……….

http://theartoftheroom.com

 http://thedecadenceproject.com

http://habituallychic.blogspot.in

wallpaper.com

lifehack.com

lifehacker.com

http://www.fromupnorth.com

 

 

TABLE SETTING GALORE

lovely………..

designtrolls

Who doesn’t enjoy some great table setting? I wish I could have tons of amazing cutlery, dinnerware, cups and glasses – so I could make amazing tablescapes happening every night of the week.

Just look at these amazing table settings! To me they are all amazeballs!

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Feel like I want to host 78 dinner parties in a row now – or get married 78 times in a row! Don’t you?

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TwistedSifter

 

Pawel Piotrowski is freelance photographer and graphic designer from Poland. A recent graduate from the Faculty of Graphics and Media Art at the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw, Pawel has recently created a tasty book that looks like a giant sandwich.

Each page features a different ingredient to what would be a most delicious meal. He’s currently looking for a publisher, so reach out if you or someone you know can help him!

To see more from Pawel, be sure to check him out at the online profiles below.

[via Colossal]

PAWEL PIOTROWSKI
Website | Facebook | Behance

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (1)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (2)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (3)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (4)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (5)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

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Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (7)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

 

book that looks like a sandwich pawel piotrowski (8)

Artwork by Pawel Piotrowski

 

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Rilke on Why Must I Write?

My thoughts – I think rilke’s advice applies not only to budding poets but to all those in search of their true passion in life ………….. to delve into  their core …………….  and look for answers within …….. with a free mind   .

http://www.openculture.com/2013/03/dennis_hopper_reads_from_rainer_maria_rilkes_timeless_guide_to_creativity_iletters_to_a_young_poeti.html

“Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet is a great book,” Hopper says in this short film from 2007. “For me the letters are a credo of creativity and a source of inspiration. After reading Rilke it became clear to me that I had no choice in the matter. I had to create.” The ten-minute film, Must I Write?, was directed by Hermann Vaske and photographed by Rain Li. Hopper reads the first of the book’s ten letters, in which Rilke tells the young man to stop seeking approval from others:

You are looking outward, and that above all you should not do now. Nobody can help and counsel you, nobody. There is only one single way. Go into yourself. Search for the reason that bids you write; find out whether it is spreading out its roots in the deepest places in your heart, acknowledge to yourself whether you would have to die if it were denied you to write. This above all–ask yourself in the stillest hour of your night: must I write? Delve into yourself for a deep answer. And if this should be affirmative, if you may meet this earnest question with a strong and simple “I must,” then build your life according to this necessity; your life even into its most indifferent and slightest hour must be a sign of this urge and a testimony to it.

A work of art is good if it has sprung from necessity. In this nature of its origin lies the judgement of it: there is no other. Therefore, my dear sir, I know no other advice for you save this: to go into yourself and test the deeps in which your life takes rise; at its source you will find the answer to the question whether you must create. Accept it, just as it sounds, without inquiring into it. Perhaps it will turn out that you are called to be an artist.

Then take that destiny upon yourself and bear it, its burden and its greatness, without ever asking what recompense might come from outside. For the creator must be a world for himself and find everything in himself and in Nature to whom he has attached himself.

creativity and luck

BOOKS TO READ

How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
The Consolations of Philosophy (2000)
The Art of Travel (2002)
Status Anxiety (2004)
The Architecture of Happiness (2006)

Alain de Botton – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia »

 

An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison – review »

The clinical psychologist’s 1995 memoir of living with manic depression has yet to be surpassed

http://99u.com/articles/6775/is-consumerism-killing-our-creativity

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? …………………….. As Annie Leonard says in The Story of Stuff, “Our primary identity has become that of being consumers – not mothers, teachers, or farmers, but of consumers. We shop and shop and shop.” We love our stuff. Yet more than the stuff itself, we love the act of finding it – the search, the anticipation………………………….Highly creative adults frequently grew up with hardship. Hardship by itself doesn’t lead to creativity, but it does force kids to become more flexible—and flexibility helps with creativity.
When we have less to work with, we have to be more creative. Think about that the next time the consumerist impulse is threatening to encroach on your creativity.

http://99u.com/articles/7292/More-Insights-on-Sharpening-Your-Creative-Mind

http://evelynrodriguez.typepad.com/crossroads_dispatches/2011/06/you-start-out-into-the-dark-strange-help-mates-come-along-joseph-campbell-ally.html If the path before you is clear, you’re pro“bably on someone else’s.” – Joseph Campbell….

“They thought it would be a disgrace to go forth in a group. Each entered the forest that he had chosen where there was no path and where it was darkest.” Now, if there’s a way or path, it’s someone else’s way; and the guru has a path for you. He knows where you are on it. He knows where he is on it, namely, way ahead. And all you can do is get to be as great as he is. This is a continuation of the dependency of childhood; maturity consists in outgrowing that and becoming your own authority for your life. And this quest for the unknown seems so romantic to Oriental people. What is unknown is the fulfillment of your own unique life, the likes of which has never existed on the earth. And you are the only one who can do it. People can give you clues how to fall down and how to stand up; but when to fall and when to stand, and when you are falling and when you are standing up, this only you can know.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/03/08/buckminster-fuller-synergetics/

Synergetics, a hefty tome of nearly 1,000 pages, is fascinating and mind-bending in its entirety. Complement it with Benjamin Betts’s Geometrical Psychology from nearly a century earlier and Bertrand Russell’s Education and the Good Life.

Children freed of the ignorantly founded educational traditions and exposed only to their spontaneously summoned, computer-stored and -distributed outflow of reliable-opinion-purged, experimentally verified data, shall indeed lead society to its happy egress from all misinformedly conceived, fearfully and legally imposed, and physically enforced customs of yesterday. They can lead all humanity into omnisuccessful survival as well as entrance into an utterly new era of human experience in an as-yet and ever-will-be fundamentally mysterious Universe.

https://i0.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/synergetics.jpg https://i1.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/milton_millman.jpg

How to stay creative etc.

http://zenhabits.net/fb/ –    Walled-in: Life Without Facebook

http://zenhabits.net/7y/ Create the Habits of Being Lean, in 7 Years

https://i2.wp.com/25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lybri12WkW1qjmwryo1_500.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lxalvcS3pu1qcz4s2o1_500.jpg

http://kathrynvercillo.hubpages.com/hub/10-Ways-to-Calm-Down-When-Anxiety-Strikes

http://balajipalamadai.blogspot.in/2010/06/phalaharini-kali-puja.html

books

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, author of “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention

http://observedinbooks.blogspot.in/2008/02/complete-artists-way-by-julia-cameron.html

Zen Habits Simple Productivity