Category: books to read


Flavors…..

Recent fav flavors from flavorwire   http://flavorwire.com/414942/10-soul-cleansing-books-to-help-you-become-a-better-person/view-all/

 

 

wild-cheryl strayed

 

Wild, Cheryl Strayed

 

If you’re one of the last people left who hasn’t picked up this book, which some have claimed is one of those rare life-changing memoirs, reading Strayed’s story of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail alone in an attempt to get over her grief and addiction is every bit as meaningful an experience as you’ve heard.

 

buck-white

 

Buck, MK Asante

 

A powerful memoir of survival after things fall apart. The Zimbabwe-born poet’s story of coming of age in North Philadelphia with his father gone, his mother committed to a mental hospital, and his brother in jail, will help you realize that — even against the toughest of odds — you can make it.

 

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And the Mountains Echoed, Khaled Hosseini

 

Khaled Hosseini is one of the world’s great storytellers, and his latest work is full of love, war, birth, death, and reflections on the impact certain decisions can have on the future.

 

 

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Borges: Selected Non-FictionsJorge Luis Borges

 

Obviously read his fiction, but there is so much wisdom to be taken from Borges’ nonfiction that as soon as you start reading it, you realize how much more you still have to learn about the world.

 

9781590170700

 

The Tenants of Moonbloom, Edward Lewis Wallant

 

In this overlooked classic from the middle of the 20th century, we watch as Moonbloom grows from an awkward and isolated middleman collecting rent from his brother’s crummy apartments into a fuller, better person. Uplifting and page-for-page perfect; you should really seek out The Tenants of Moonbloom.

 

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Leaves of Grass, Walt Whitman

 

Who hasn’t felt inspired by Whitman’s — and possibly America’s — greatest poetry collection? A meditation on what is, but more importantly, what could be. Spend your day with this if you’re looking to recharge.

 

 

9780300164985

 

Essays, Henry David Thoreau

 

This collection of Thoreau’s most famous essays on solitary soul searching and self-discovery in the Massachusetts woods is the perfect type of thing to read if you are looking to step outside your own comfort zone.

 

9781604592337

 

The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass

 

Very few life stories showcase the overcoming of adversity and oppression to quite the same extent as this autobiography of one of America’s most inspirational figures.

 

The_Giving_Tree

 

The Giving Tree, Shel Silverstein

 

For those in search of something a little lighter, we’d suggest reading (or re-reading) this one, and remembering that Shel Silverstein really just wanted to make all of us — including kids — better people.

http://flavorwire.com/415874/50-foreign-language-films-everyone-needs-to-see-1963-2013/view-all/

http://flavorwire.com/415874/50-foreign-language-films-everyone-needs-to-see-1963-2013/view-all/

http://flavorwire.com/418478/scandalous-photos-of-shameful-librarian-confessions/

http://flavorwire.com/418437/11-ingenious-bookshelves-made-from-unusual-repurposed-items/view-all/

the quotidian to the completely outlandish. Here are some particularly interesting ideas.

 

 

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A car

 

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boat-bookcase

 

A boat

 

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21-Brillant-Objects-Made-From-Recycled-Materials-16

 

 

 

Plumbing-2

 

Your plumbing

 

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king-tut-life-sized-sarcophagus-book-case

 

That sarcophagus you just happen to have hanging about in the garage*

 

[via]

 

* Just kidding: it’s from SkyMall, because of course it is

 

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A staircase

 

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Skateboards

 

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An old ladder

 

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Tardis-Bookshelf-l

 

… and your, um, TARDIS

 

Bonus: it’s bigger on the inside.

http://flavorwire.com/418231/the-literary-worlds-most-fascinating-dandies-past-and-present/view-all/

 

 

 

Book Club {Paris Street Style} | buddhachic and buttercream.

10 Guideposts for Wholehearted Living

  1. Cultivating Authenticity: Letting Go of What People Think
  2. Cultivating Self‐Compassion: Letting Go of Perfectionism
  3. Cultivating a Resilient Spirit: Letting Go of Numbing and Powerlessness
  4. Cultivating Gratitude and Joy: Letting Go of Scarcity and Fear of the Dark
  5. Cultivating Intuition and Trusting Faith: Letting Go of the Need for Certainty
  6. Cultivating Creativity: Letting Go of Comparison
  7. Cultivating Play and Rest: Letting Go of Exhaustion as a Status Symbol and Productivity as Self‐Worth
  8. Cultivating Calm and Stillness: Letting Go of Anxiety as a Lifestyle
  9. Cultivating Meaningful Work: Letting Go of Self‐Doubt and “SupposedTo”
  10. Cultivating Laughter, Song, and Dance: Letting Go of Being Cool and “Always in Control”

sub rosa

“Maybe stories are just data with a soul”

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Being a super-cool-critical European intellectual, I must admit I have some issues with the work of Brené Brown. One part of me want to label her work on “how to love your own imperfect self, while you are daring greatly in a wholehearted way” as some kind typical American Positivism designed for already successful people, while another part of me finds her research really convincing, ground-breaking, and brave!
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So; following dr. Brown’s advise on thinking twice before deciding (or as Kahneman would have put it: contacting system 2) , I end up siding with my own second thoughts: Brené Brown’s work is well worth studying!
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Brown is talking a lot about Wholeheartedness, but what exactly does it mean to be wholehearted? Here is how she defines it:

The capacity to engage in our lives with…

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http://matadornetwork.com/bnt/the-50-greatest-travel-books-of-all-time/

I doubt if I can read all of them  , but my first picks are  Kerouac , (has long been on my list) , Salak ,Krakauer , have read few of Whitman , Rilke , Ginsberg (I think  he and kerouac together , for knowing about the beat generation)  and of course – Mehta /Mumbai. These are the classic recos , but i think there are many works of fiction , which i  picked up for a dose of mystery or chicklit etc and  ended up travelling ( armchair travel , I mean 🙂  ), as the writers succeeded in intertwining the plot with the place , making it a fascinating read  .

My recos : So from the works of fiction I’ve read ( and can hopefully recollect) thus far – picks from my limited knowledge –   The Razor’s Edge ( W. Somerset Maugham) – Paris in all its bohemian glory  ,  Austen / bronte – for their depiction of english countrysides ( envy lizzie’s walks in the countryside , beautifully picturised  in the  adaptation *ing Ehle – my all-time fav portrayal of   Miss Bennet) , FINDING MONSIEUR RIGHT – Muriel Zagha and  Ellen byerrum‘s  Lost corset( should carry  these 2 as tour guides for Paris) , Out of africa – the real Africa in all its glory  – incomplete without its ethnic tribes – the Masai – poignantly portrayed by Isak , Autobiography of a Yogi by Paramhansa Yogananda  – though not a travel book as such , I think it portrays the hidden India , our soul- which we are trying to move away from , a mystery set in  Maine –  the name of which I can’t  recollect as of now , Shallow breath – Australia , with its beaches and wildlife , Louise penny‘s books  for a peek into the Canadian countryside etc. Now for the matador   list :

1. Death in the Afternoon by Ernest Hemingway

2. The Great Railway Bazaar by Paul Theroux 

3. Finding George Orwell in Burma by Emma Larkin

4. When We Were Orphans by Kazou Ishiguro

5. Four Corners: Into the Heart of New Guinea-One Woman’s Solo Journey by Kira Salak

6. On the Road by Jack Kerouac

7. Into the Wild by John Krakauer

8. Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress: A Novel by Dai Sijie

9. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown

10. Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie

11. America Is in the Heart by Carlos Bulosan

12. Balkan Ghosts: A Journey Through History by Robert D. Kaplan

13. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

14. Video Night in Kathmandu: And Other Reports from the Not-So-Far East by Pico Iyer

15. The Castle by Franz Kafka

16. Life of Pi by Yann Martel

17. The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera

18. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

19. The Dark Room by Rachel Seiffert

20. The Tale of Murasaki: A Novel by Liza Dalby

21. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

22. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thomson

23. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway

24. Lord of the Flies by William S. Golding

25. Dubliners by James Joyce

26. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

27. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry

28. Maximum City Maximum City by Suketu Mehta

29. In Patagonia by Bruce Chatwin

30. Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes

31. Seven Years in Tibet by Heinrich Harrer

32. Going Solo by Roald Dahl

33. I Dreamed of Africa by Kuki Gallman

34. The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific by J. Maarten Troost

35. Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Marie Rilke

36. The Living City by Frank Lloyd Wright

37. Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon

38. The Beach by Alex Garland

39. The Size of the World: Once Around Without Leaving the Ground by Jeff Greenwald

40. Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles

41. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne

42. The Road to Oxiana by Robert Byron

43. Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck

44. The Innocents Abroad by Mark Twain

45. The Book Bag by W. Somerset Maugham

46. The Summing Up by W. Somerset Maugham

47. The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham

48. Collected Poems 1947-1997 by Allen Ginsberg

49. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

50. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

Bring a vacation home into your interiors by following the cottage style influence.   The cottage style brings in relaxation, casual charm and an open atmosphere to any space.  Cottages are usually associated with calming retreats away from your daily life routine, such as visiting a beach or perhaps a bungalow in the city or even in escaping to a cabin tucked away in the woods.  So create this ambiance in your own favorite spaces or home décor.  The cottage style is a bit simplistic than most but none the less filled with plenty of beauty and serenity. – See more at: http://stagetecture.com/2013/06/guest-blogger-how-to-bring-cottage-style-into-your-interiors/#sthash.Bbdhwip5.A8ZlGoaH.dpuf
Bring a vacation home into your interiors by following the cottage style influence.   The cottage style brings in relaxation, casual charm and an open atmosphere to any space.  Cottages are usually associated with calming retreats away from your daily life routine, such as visiting a beach or perhaps a bungalow in the city or even in escaping to a cabin tucked away in the woods.  So create this ambiance in your own favorite spaces or home décor.  The cottage style is a bit simplistic than most but none the less filled with plenty of beauty and serenity. – See more at: http://stagetecture.com/2013/06/guest-blogger-how-to-bring-cottage-style-into-your-interiors/#sthash.Bbdhwip5.fVbWhLw6.dpuf

Write text here…

Artfully curated – The Hindu.

Poets hide like seeds/only to return in new forms/At least now their breed is in no danger of extinction

The different retellings of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, love poetry from classical Tamil literature, Bhakti poetry, devotional poems bordering on the erotic, playful poems on gender politics, Urdu and Vedic poems.

Reading the book is like visiting an artfully curated museum of poetry from the Vedas to the present, except that the editors break logic and clichés of time, placing Kalidasa next to Nissim Ezekiel or Auvaiyar next to Ayyappa Paniker. Instead of choosing a chronological or alphabetical order, the editors arrange the poems thematically across 10 sections.

The arrogance and fierce possessiveness of a poet comes through in “ If anyone faults my poetry, even my teacher,/even God himself, I’ll fight back/and win .” The poem is ‘I was born for poetry’ by Chellapilla Venkata Sastri and translated from the Telugu by Velchuru Narayana Rao.

Nara’s ‘White Paper’, Nanne Coda’s ‘On Poetry in Telugu’, Bharthari’s ‘Her Face Is Not The Moon, Nor Are Her Eyes’, the extract from Ezhuthacchan’s ‘Adhyatma Ramayana’, Mona Zote’s ‘What Poetry Means to Ernestina in Peril’ were delightful discoveries.

There is Andal, Purandara Das, Subramania Bharati, Tukaram, Mohammed Iqbal and Mirabai, all rendered in translation, of course.

The Indian landscape grows more ironic in Gopal Honnagere’s ‘How to Tame a Pair of New Chappals’: “ don’t take them to your temple/they may at once come to know you are weak/your god is false and start biting you/ ” he says, in his list of instructions for us.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-literaryreview/a-part-of-the-whole/article4470668.ece

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-fridayreview/mind-and-its-moves/article4560152.ece

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-metroplus/the-monk-who-went-to-harvard/article4560455.ece

creativity and luck

BOOKS TO READ

How Proust Can Change Your Life (1997)
The Consolations of Philosophy (2000)
The Art of Travel (2002)
Status Anxiety (2004)
The Architecture of Happiness (2006)

Alain de Botton – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia »

 

An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness by Kay Redfield Jamison – review »

The clinical psychologist’s 1995 memoir of living with manic depression has yet to be surpassed

http://99u.com/articles/6775/is-consumerism-killing-our-creativity

Have you ever fallen into a black hole of comparison shopping? …………………….. As Annie Leonard says in The Story of Stuff, “Our primary identity has become that of being consumers – not mothers, teachers, or farmers, but of consumers. We shop and shop and shop.” We love our stuff. Yet more than the stuff itself, we love the act of finding it – the search, the anticipation………………………….Highly creative adults frequently grew up with hardship. Hardship by itself doesn’t lead to creativity, but it does force kids to become more flexible—and flexibility helps with creativity.
When we have less to work with, we have to be more creative. Think about that the next time the consumerist impulse is threatening to encroach on your creativity.

http://99u.com/articles/7292/More-Insights-on-Sharpening-Your-Creative-Mind

http://evelynrodriguez.typepad.com/crossroads_dispatches/2011/06/you-start-out-into-the-dark-strange-help-mates-come-along-joseph-campbell-ally.html If the path before you is clear, you’re pro“bably on someone else’s.” – Joseph Campbell….

“They thought it would be a disgrace to go forth in a group. Each entered the forest that he had chosen where there was no path and where it was darkest.” Now, if there’s a way or path, it’s someone else’s way; and the guru has a path for you. He knows where you are on it. He knows where he is on it, namely, way ahead. And all you can do is get to be as great as he is. This is a continuation of the dependency of childhood; maturity consists in outgrowing that and becoming your own authority for your life. And this quest for the unknown seems so romantic to Oriental people. What is unknown is the fulfillment of your own unique life, the likes of which has never existed on the earth. And you are the only one who can do it. People can give you clues how to fall down and how to stand up; but when to fall and when to stand, and when you are falling and when you are standing up, this only you can know.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/03/08/buckminster-fuller-synergetics/

Synergetics, a hefty tome of nearly 1,000 pages, is fascinating and mind-bending in its entirety. Complement it with Benjamin Betts’s Geometrical Psychology from nearly a century earlier and Bertrand Russell’s Education and the Good Life.

Children freed of the ignorantly founded educational traditions and exposed only to their spontaneously summoned, computer-stored and -distributed outflow of reliable-opinion-purged, experimentally verified data, shall indeed lead society to its happy egress from all misinformedly conceived, fearfully and legally imposed, and physically enforced customs of yesterday. They can lead all humanity into omnisuccessful survival as well as entrance into an utterly new era of human experience in an as-yet and ever-will-be fundamentally mysterious Universe.

https://i0.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/synergetics.jpg https://i1.wp.com/www.brainpickings.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/milton_millman.jpg

books to read

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/03/21/must-read-books-music-emotion-brain/What Freud has to do with auditory cheesecake, European opera and world peace.

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/01/25/must-read-books-happiness/From Plato to Buddha, or what imperfection has to do with the neuroscience of the good life.

i think russell shud hav been added to the list – https://excerptsandm.wordpress.com/2011/05/08/the-conquest-of-happiness-bertrand-russell/

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-literaryreview/crime-born-of-passion/article4373936.ece

But the book’s lingering quality — its ability to stay under a reader’s skin long after its secrets had been disclosed — hinged on its portrayal of two characters who match wits: one a brilliant physicist-sleuth named Yukawa (also known as Detective Galileo) and the other a criminal with almost unfathomable, monk-like reserves of personal dedication and forbearance.

When it is revealed, a reader’s instinctive response might be to snort and say “Impossible” (which is what the detectives listening to Yukawa do). I even felt a little cheated at first, as if the author had blindsided me by stepping outside the permissible limits of the genre. But further reflection shifted my perception of what was possible and what wasn’t; I began to see the peculiar internal logic of the denouement in light of the personalities and the lifestyles involved, and the crime no longer appeared unfeasible.

The actual writing has some of the functional woodenness that you find in most commercial fiction of this sort — too many references to a character’s eyes “widening in surprise”, for example, or hands gripping a phone tightly when unexpected news is received — but these are tics of the genre, easy enough to ignore up to a point. (Besides, as has often been observed, when Japanese is translated into English, the results can seem a little stilted and over-formal, especially when the reader is from a culture that doesn’t understand why a detective might remove his shoes outside a house before going in to question a murder suspect.)

This book is about a crime born of very deep passion, but with no sudden bursts of action, no explicit violence or dramatic confrontations, it is unnerving in ways that more conventional thrillers are not. And despite the fact that the setting is a homogenous modern city and the characters are in some ways indistinguishable from upper-middle-class people living anywhere in the world, there is something distinctly Japanese about it, something of the deceptive placidity of the filmmaker Ozu or the novelist Ishiguro. There is a sense of a neat and ordered contemporary world with mystical rumblings beneath its surface, reminiscent of the Sheep Man in Haruki Murakami’s novels, hidden in a forgotten corner of a glass-and-steel skyscraper, or a videotape being employed by supernatural forces in Koji Suzuki’s Ring series. Higashino’s book is set in a world of tidy kitchens with coffee-makers and bottled mineral water, of sophisticated dinners and dating parties, but beneath it all is something more primal. The image one is left with at the end is the indelible one of a predatory spider watching quietly, patiently over her web.

http://kathrynvercillo.hubpages.com/hub/10-Ways-to-Calm-Down-When-Anxiety-Strikes

http://balajipalamadai.blogspot.in/2010/06/phalaharini-kali-puja.html

books

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, author of “Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention

http://observedinbooks.blogspot.in/2008/02/complete-artists-way-by-julia-cameron.html

ShiningSoulYoga

Many people think of exercising and fitness as something that only takes place at a gym or fitness facility. Unfortunately, they are overlooking the fact that

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