Category: arts


E from hlf 2020

Could attend only day 2 of Hyd literature festival 2020 . Lavish buffet for thought…. Paromita , Saba Dewan -new perspectives. Remembering Nabaneeta Dev Sen . Bahar dutt , kalpana Sharma – Rewilding and the need for environmental journalism in the era of bushfires, Delhi smog and massive climate changes. Although , people in urban spaces are also slowly speaking up, there is need for more voices changes for environmental preservation. Paromita and Usha Raman – New digital era – freedoms gained but landscapes lost. We have LOST THE LANGUAGE OF FEELINGS. The blanket of morality…. Is marriage an outdated concept? Stepping beyond binaries into fluidity. Experientiality is most important today ,as shared experiences create lived wisdom. A healthy relationship is not a preset, it should be personalized. Freedom to live his , her or their own life,is its own education. The difficult experiences educate one about what he or she they want in life. Theyyam and kodiyattam – Margi Madhu, Ingu G and Indu Chinta- art as worship , artist as devotee. Landmarks such as schools -memories – tangible heritage. Art forms and cultural traditions are intangible heritages . The kodiyattam artist, Margi Madhu said that practicing for 10 years only made him mimic his guru. He needs 25 years to think, reimagine and develop his own style. Such a dedication is difficult to sustain in contemporary society, where patient audiences are needed to sit through a 2,3 or more hours of performance. Theyyam is not a dance – it is purely ritual – a visual spectacle . The word “Theyyam ” is derived from “daivam ” – God. It refers to both the art and the artist . It is an act of worship, where spectators are more like devotees. Learning is by instruction and imitation. It is a visual spectacle , with ornate hairdressing and face drawing . There are 30 basic patterns which are mixed and matched to create 600 designs. The artist is a mirror in kodiyattam. An optional history of Indian women- Saba Dewan and Paromita Vohra. What is “acceptable” womanhood ? What is “acceptable” creative expression ? Women always set themselves up to impossible ideals, and are constantly in this betwixt and between about wanting to be and should be. Women continue to be defined vis a vis their relationships with men. A woman has a right to be unapologetically herself, without being a flag bearer of anything (i did it or i am this way because i like it , not because so and so happened to me). In an epic the story never ends, it’s ending is only a beginning. Humanising plants is a way of saving them – Nirupa rao -plants of western ghats

Jonathan Hollander    “India stands out in the world for having eight distinct classical dance forms and hundreds of folk dance forms so the richness of Indian music and dance can never be fully understood or explored. There’s always more material to discover,” he explains. The company has also been conscientious about its work in dance as a means of ‘social cohesion’, most prominently in conflict zones around the world, including Thailand, Iraq, Israel-Palestine and North and South Korea. They are also known for their workshops and programmes that reach out to schools and young talent about the importance of dance. Among the most significant of these programmes is the 20-hour ‘Dancing to Connect’ programme conducted by their dancers in over 62 countries. The company, led by Jonathan, was also instrumental in establishing arts education at the school levels in New York Public schools.

When we undertake a programme like this, it inspires us, makes us love our art form even more because we see that it can do something for people. It can bring joy and reveal capacity to other people that they didn’t know they had.” This stems from their deep concern for the world and the need to understand what they, as dancers can do.

“As a team we contribute a lot. When we do this, we set tasks in motion. Young people like to dance, you are not going to teach somebody to dance in 20 hours, but you can create an environment where they feel free to experiment and innovate.

Languet 

Weight of Joy was devised exploring the title’s seemingly contradictory ideas — weight and burden, paired with lightness and joy. Languet asks, “What is the price to pay for a joyful moment? For there are both pure moments of bliss, and others that can harm people.” He began by “asking each dancer for his/her definition of not happiness, but joy. Then my interest lay in the conditions of emergence of joy, where does it come from”…….Creating ways to enable disabled and non-disabled people to dance together, Languet explains, is about moving away from preconcieved notions of a so-called standard model of movement for a normal body. Instead, he gives “everyone tools to develop their own repertoire of movement. It is about re-assessing what can be beautiful.”

Hakanai  

Hakanaï converges the technology zeitgeist with a cathartic dance to evoke nuances of evanescence.Hakanaï, which is Japanese for ‘fleeting’and ‘delicate,’is described as a “choreography that draws the evanescence of dreams and the impermanence of things.” This emotive digital art and dance was created by Claire Bardainne and Adrien Mondot of the Adrien M et Clair B Company in 2013 after careful formulating with a large team of programmers, scenographers, sound designers and visual artists.

The poetics of the precise

….Neha Lavingia’s small-format works may be described as visual haiku. They speak of the precise, the poetics of the minimal. “In the push, pull and shove of life, how often do we take the time to stand, to stare, to wonder, to feel, to experience?” …….

 

Madhvi Subrahmanian, another Mumbai artist, is known for her larger-than-life ceramics that emulate the human form. They evoke a gamut of textures, shapes and shades, but she has scaled down the size of some her works and those are the ones that fit in perfectly with this show. She continues her exploration of and reflection on the urban environment and its disconnect with nature, as she had done in her recent solo show, ‘Mapping Memory’. ‘Mappa Mundi’ maps the routes of her daily journeys while ‘Dilli’ is constructed with cones as markers of time. Her work titled ‘Blue Print’ juxtaposes the city map with a house, directing attention to the human desire for congregation and dwelling.

The works of the three artists are united by their architectural feel and their quietness. While Minimalism as a movement was primarily dominated by male artists (as was painting itself), in the early 1960s artists like the late Nasreen Mohamedi and New York-based Zarina Hashmi created a space for women artists to experiment with minimalism. Mohamedi’s retrospective at The Met Breuer in New York created waves among the cognoscenti.

The spartan nature of her straight lines and grids said much more than daubs of paint could. Her work unwittingly broke several assumptions about ‘women artists’.

It is generally assumed that women paint decorative canvases and dwell only on feminine subjects. While this might be true of many women artists, several male artists too create decorative and autobiographical works.

Gender does not and should not decide the stylistic domain of any artist. One would be best advised to ignore the gender of the artist and enjoy the art, given that it is a universal language that urges us to uncomplicate our lives and go for the simple.

The reclaiming of public spaces is the running theme at this year’s Urban Lens Festival

He could have raged on about it, but was advised by a confidant to get creative instead. The expression of dissent would then last forever, not just stay relevant for the moment. So Prabh Deep started articulating angst and anguish in his rap songs. He now has a loyal SoundCloud following and revels in the endorsement he has been getting, not just from family and friends but, as he puts it, from his “hood” (neighbourhood) as well.

Music gives meaning to his life, makes him feel alive; the street where he has been living for almost two decades is his anchor and inspiration. And the two passions come together in a song called ‘Delhi 18’ (an ode to his pincode). The defiance reflected in their music stems as much from circumstances and situations as it does from the claustrophobia (physical and psychological) they feel in their homes and lives.

The journey of immigrants in Daphna Awadish’s enchanting Journey Birds is across countries. The unique animation presents individuals as hybrids between human beings and birds, those who have flown far away from their original nests to build homes elsewhere. Four narratives — of Nona, Irene, Abraham and Karen — provide commentary as Awadish explores the aching for a homeland and the curiosity for a new habitat. I still don’t know where I want to be, says one of the immigrants. I can’t say whether I am at home here, says another.

 

Political Mother - Hofesh Schecter

Today – Political mother – By  Hofesh Schecter company – Where there is pressure , there is folk dance  ! – harmonious chaos or chaotic harmony ?? Innovative , the dance and music blend into each other  , the moves are emotive and energetic .Overall definitely worth it for the innovative mix of lighting-music-dance , but prefer watching contemporary  ballet ( waiting for a good cb troupe to tour  India…..)

August 24 – the DCH play @MPTF 2014, was more of like “Om Shanti Om”  song in that Farah Khan filck …… less of  theatre,  more of theatre personalities ,   but kudos to the trio for showcasing contemporary / budding  hyderabadi theatre /culture  ( courtesy , open cultural places like Lamakaan , the GZ and AF)

P.S:- ‘Tis been a week of discovering new sounds – thanks to OD @twitter for introducing me to the amazing Gillian welch – country music speaks to the soul

Also , ‘ THE BLACKLIST episodes have some really fab OSTs………….(but worth watchin’ for one-man show- “the Spader” – never disappoints. )

 

Gallery of Views of Modern Rome — Giovanni Paolo Panini.

Panini

Art

Hyderabad Literary Festival 2014 – January 26, 2014 11:30 am Sunday  Creative writing workshop , Madhu Kaza …… just write – Zen @ LMK – loved it…..looking forward to another work shop by Kaza

13-Mar-2014  Women’s Poetry: Poetry Readings Curated By S.Swami  @ GZ, wanna go nxt yr too

29th march 2014 – Flea market – @ the first Twin City Theater and Cultural Festival  @ Roots

June 07, 2014  Saturday – Dramanon -“A Four Letter word”.Play @ LMK – Ganesh- vulnerable , R.Ghosh – slips into characters , Saurabh amazing !……..song at the end of the “blind blanch ” , nash – sunshine- moved ……..  lifted my low spirits

Fav excerpts from The Hindu

Some 70mm moments – The Hindu. Reminded me of one of my fav OSTs –  the departures soundtrack –  Music

A still from Departures.

The International Film Festival in Goa in November 2013 came alive with young audiences from across the country patiently standing in long lines to watch serious world cinema. They were the real stars of this festival. In many shows, disappointed audiences were turned away because every seat was taken. There is a new audience out there, ready for new ideas, new film grammar, and new reflective cinema. The time is long overdue for a publically financed network of art theatres in every city in the country. In my three days in Goa, I spent most time with the Soul of Asia segment, which introduced me to some fine films described in an earlier column. I recall here a few other films which remain with me even as the weeks pass after the festival. The best of these, from the same Soul segment, is a meditative exploration of death and the discovery of the joy of service. In the Japanese Departures, Director Yojiro Takita follows an out-of-work cello player, desperate to find any employment to survive. The young man answers an enigmatic advertisement from a funeral company, and finds that his work involves embalming and decorating corpses before they are buried. Gradually, he discovers an unexpected vocation in helping bereaved families cope with death, loss and regret.

Another reflective film, on the theme of loneliness, is the Dutch director Nanouk Leopold’s It’s All So Quiet. A middle-aged farmer lives alone in his dairy-farm with his bed-bound elderly father whom he tends diligently but without love, haunted by memories of childhood violence. As he perseveres with his daily routine of caring for his milch cattle, there are two other men he encounters regularly, one a milk collector who drives to the farm each day to pick up milk; and another, a very young farm hand who takes a room in the farmhouse. Each barely talks with the other, but there is throughout an undercurrent of unfulfilled emotional and sexual longing. The film adopts a minimalist narrative style, deploying few words and even less drama. But it evokes a lingering sense of solitude and isolation, which resonated deeply.

Adopting a diametrically opposite idiom of exuberant comic irony is Philippine director Jeffrey Jeturian’s Ekstra (Extra), an affectionate salute to the underdog. It follows one day in the life of a middle-aged woman extra, a bit player in television soap operas, after she is woken in the early hours of the morning one day to drive to a location shoot in the neighbouring countryside. The director subversively casts one of the Philippines’ best-loved actors, Vilma Santos, in the role of the extra. The viewer for once roots for the anonymous crowd — the farmer on the fields, the domestic help patiently waiting, and the guests in the background of a wedding — while the lead players strut and recite their lines. We watch the class system in the enormous gaps in food and lodging between stars and extras. The film mocks the hilarious script trajectories of the soap opera, and the vanity and fragile egos of its lead players. I often felt that if just the names were changed in the film’s script, it could have been located in India with no substantial changes.

There were many homage retrospectives as well, including of Czech director Jiri Menzel, whose entertaining but slight opera comedy Don Juans opened the festival.However, the tribute which delighted me the most was the one to Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, an exceptional screen writer who passed away earlier this year. She was through all her adult life an acutely observant, unsentimental but sympathetic chronicler of the human condition. Her life spanned three continents, and she belonged to all, but also to none. A Polish Jew born in Germany in the 1930s, her father survived the Holocaust but took his own life when he discovered that almost his entire family was slaughtered. Ruth married a Parsi Indian architect Jhabvala, lived in and loved India until 1975. She moved to New York where until her death she collaborated with James Ivory and Ismail Merchant to write many memorable films.This was a single-film tribute, and we owe Jhabvala’s memory a richer retrospective of all her films. In Goa I enjoyed watching Shakespeare Wallah with Ruth’s elder daughter, Renana Jhabvala, a senior social worker whose work in SEWA I have long admired, who the festival authorities had invited to pay tribute to her mother. As I watched the film 45 years after I first saw it, I found fitting that Ruth’s story was ultimately about impermanence and the inevitability of change. The poignancy of the doomed idealism of a British theatre company dedicated to introducing Indian audiences to Shakespeare, but for whom people have no time as tastes change and time moves forward inexorably, was heightened acutely for me as I watched an India of my childhood now long past.

Dance like a man

C.V. Chandrasekar in performance. Photo: R. Ravindran

Rhythm beyond music

It is common knowledge that tala or rhythm adds a vital dimension to music by completing the triad of ragam, taalam and bhavam. Without tala, music would be rudderless. Without rhythm, nature would be monotonous!

It is not often realised that rhythm is a subtle and omnipresent element that goes beyond the realms of music. It impacts us from all sides.

“Life is about rhythm. We vibrate, our hearts are pumping blood, we are a rhythm machine, that’s what we are,” said popular American percussionist and musicologist Mickey Hart.

Rhythm is present in some form or the other in all aspects of our existence. To begin with, let us draw an elaborate analogy between music where rhythm is distinctly cognisable and the environment around us where it is subtle.

The importance of tala cannot be undermined.  It binds music together.  A hundred voices at the Thyagaraja Aradhana vocalise Pancharatna Kritis in unison in a particular raga.  What holds them together and prevents the disparate elements from running helter-skelter?  It is the tala that lends cohesiveness to the rendition.

The legendary percussionists of yore Palghat Mani Iyer and Palni Subramaniam Pillai unequivocally established the fact that rhythm was the sine qua non for an ideal concert.

Ustad Zakir Hussain’s twinkling fingers pirouetting on the twin heads of his tabla often times blurred the lines between music and rhythm! The rhythmic tintinnabulation emanating from the ankles of Kathak maestro Birju Maharaj causes one’s spine to tingle.

If Carnatic music can be traced to the Sama Veda, it also draws upon the esoteric metric values that govern the chanting of the Sama Veda stotrams.

In western classical music too, the various genres are centred round their respective rhythmic patterns, be it decked in movements such as adagio, allegro or vivace! The quest for rhythmic perfection is achieved by a strict adherence to the ubiquitous metronome during practice sessions.

Music moves as does rhythm. It is the ineluctable rhythm underlining the music that unwittingly touches, excites or depresses one.  It can put one in a romantic frame of mind through lilting beats or lull one into a soporific mood through a monotonous beat dulling the senses!

Latin rhythms like samba and rumba shoot up the adrenaline; bolero and beguine create the romantic mood; R and B induce trance and salsa generates a sense of foot-tapping exhilaration.

Rhythm in its subtle form defines poetry in all languages as it does, for example, the sonnets of Shakespeare in the iambic Pentameters. Eminent English Poet, Alfred Lord Tennyson, describing The Brook creates an onomatopoeaic effect (read poetic rhythm). with the following lines: “I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles.”

Rhythms are the very ingredients — sometimes palpable, sometimes too subtle for cognition — that keep us tickling through life. The first signs of rhythmic heartbeat are noticed when the foetus is 40 days old!

Later in life, it is the heart rate, pulse on the wrist and the rush of blood (BP) calibrated through the veins and arteries that determine whether the rhythms of life are healthy or not! An arrhythmic heart spells danger just as how indifferent rhythm could ruin good music!

Nature has rhythm written all over it. The staccato chirping of birds, the trumpeting of elephants, the “legato” growl of the big cats, the cacophonous chatter of primates, the cadence of waterfalls, the roll of thunder and the tremolo whistling of the zephyr —  all bespeak an infinite variety of rhythms that permeate the environment. And many a musical score has been inspired by them!

At a macrocosmic level, the entire constellation, studded with planets, has its own rhythmic cycle to fashion its movement as in the intricate interior of a wristwatch.

Life appears to be one long symphony to be appreciated in all its rhythmic hues as we keep time on the path to eternity!

This too shall pass

 

Illustration: Satwik Gade

The author looks at the year that was.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. It was the year of promising sanity, it was the year of blinding hypocrisy, it was the time of dwindling religious belief, it was the time of horrendous religious fundamentalism, we have everything before us and we have nothing before us. So here’s what 2013 was about.

A former colonist country that spent centuries exploiting and systematically stripping Africa invaded the North African country of Mali, in a strange twist of historical irony, to liberate it from militant Islamism.The West, that decries the spreading virus of fundamentalism, still used all its technical might to write one of the world’s most sophisticated computer viruses, STUXNET, to seriously damage Iran’s nuclear programme. This year, the country eventually caved in and agreed to limit its ambitions in exchange for lifting of sanctions that go back to a people’s revolution that replaced a tyrannical West-backed Shah who was put in place after the assassination of a democratically elected head of state who wanted to nationalise the country’s oil resources.Meanwhile, North Korea was busy turning the cognitive dissonance knob to 11. They still use DOS, floppies, fax machines and Dyanora TVs but managed to detonate a nuclear bomb underground. Comically obsolete, yet scarily dangerous.Speaking of comical obsolescence, Jorge Mario Bergoglio from Argentina became the first head of a major religion in the 21 century to actually make sense in a world that is rapidly running away from religious belief. As faith struggles for relevance and grows stale with mould, he is a breath of fresh air.While religions are still figuring out if it’s okay for a woman to have control over her reproductive parts and if it’s moral for two consenting same-sex adults to love each other, scientists in the US managed to clone human embryonic stem cells. It is one of the most significant breakthroughs in bio-technology, one that could eventually cure many of our most intractable diseases and increase our lifespan to the point where retiring at 60 will seem ridiculously early. Folks in Texas were printing guns in 3D this year, while professors in Cornell University were printing ears in 3D with actual living cell-gels, thus promising a future where we can give printed ears to people shot at by other people with printed guns.Snowden in 2013 revealed what George Orwell in 1949 had already revealed in 1984: that Big Brothers who spy on their citizens will go on to do very bad things. He then asked for asylum in a country with a long history of its own citizens seeking asylum from his country.At the same time, the world lost a brother with a big heart, Nelson Mandela, who was imprisoned for 27 years based on intelligence provided by American spies to an apartheid regime. His death subsequently brought forth a torrent of hypocrisy on social media, with senators who had voted to declare Mandela a terrorist now composing 140-character paeans in his praise.As one democracy spied on its citizens, the struggling democracy of Egypt deposed a democratically-elected government because it was too religiously inclined.Typhoons and cyclones hit us hard this year while we were still busy debating the political correctness of ‘climate change’ vs. ‘global warming’. We bemoaned pollution in our cities while driving internal combustion engines powered by subsidised diesel and asking for ‘extra plastic covers’ from retailers.India sent a probe to Mars and underpaid maids to the US, while China sent a rover to the Moon and underpaid employees to their deaths several floors below sweatshop complexes. The US launched a dysfunctional website to fix a dysfunctional healthcare system and launched functional drones to kill innocent people at wedding functions.We produced civil engineers who write software code for banks, while churning out whizkids in Newtonian mechanics who migrate to the US to design complex financial derivatives for banks that bring down world economies to the point where outsourcing to India is simply the only way to go. We seem to have that strategy nailed down.  Our moviemakers are still making films that disobey every law the good Isaac ever wrote down. We then universally pan these movies, criticise them to bits, rant about them eloquently and then fork out Rs. 450 per IMAX ticket to watch them with our families because well… it’s timepass.

Greed and treachery – The Hindu.

With Samurai-ish costumes and Tai chi like graceful dance with the sword , was regaled with some excellent delivery of Shakespearean gems by the actors, especially the ones playing Macbeth  , Lady Mac , Duncan …..looking forward to more plays by Nishumbita.

A scene from William Shakespeare's Macbeth staged by Nishumbita. Photo: G. Ramakrishna

Coco’s lunch and The Prophet

17th November 2013 –  mom’s b’day  – took her to the dance ballet which she enjoyed too, differed from my usual single outings…, Prophet –  profound  – self reflective , apt in India – are people drawn to the prophet by the serenity of countenance or is his/her countenance of  serenity a mask to gain followers /disciples /ulterior motives ????  I dance no more on a stage , ‘coz the world is my stage now and the rhythms of the nature are  my dance beats ……….. deep dialogue ,accompanied by an amazing narrative voice ……… impressed by the artistic /talented duo – srikanth -savitha.

24th Nov  2013 -Could not attend Plaistow , but Coco’s lunch (24th Nov) more than made up for it – reminded me of all the wonderful carribean (and soothing bolivian ) mixtapes dad brought from London  , shared with him by  trainees from Africa ….. when I was a kid …………but amazing , the way the band fused Carnatic with Western …..and the Afro beats – out of this world ……….foot starts tapping to the beat –  “involuntary rhythmic movements ” ….too much of neurology hangover……Go NovFest !….

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Allegory of Air — Jean-Baptiste Oudry

Aug 24th 2013 – loved the play – HTS Giraffe @ RB on Aug 24th  – Witty Satirification – i reviewed  it @The Hindu as satirical questionification ,  – (my first ever review to get published  ,surprise surprise ?!?! )Many points worth pondering ……..Vanilla urbanisation , people on blind dates conversing about how many friends / albums they have on Social Networks , the decline of free thinking etc.etc. – worth introspecting .

review

Review

JS @ RamaKrishna Math ……… Spiritual / philosophical gems explained by monks . Excerpts :

Can one really understand / get 2 know reality unless one knows god ?

Death moves with us as our shadow.

The ‘I’ /Ego is like a bullock tied to a tree – just keeps going round and round.

He who hides himself best , accomplishes the most – after  all ,  the Lord is hidden.

Conquer yourself and the whole world is yours.

Meditation is like taking bath in the holy waters of the mind.