Archive for September 13, 2013


Inside the Tagore home

  Inside the Tagore home – The Hindu.

 Excerpt :-

In North Kolkata, big gates lead into Rabindranath Tagore’s ancestral home, Jorasanko. Staircases lead up to wide verandas that skirt rooms with high ceilings, cold black and white marble floors and arched doorways with green louvered shutters. They all overlook a courtyard downstairs. Once, the big rooms were filled with men in their crinkly dhotis and kurtas holding animated discussions and debates on art, literature and politics. In the abarodh or the women’s quarters, mothers, wives, sisters, daughters and daughters-in-law held sway.

Like Tara of Gone with the Wind , or Manderly of Rebecca , Jorasanko drips atmosphere. The great house was packed to the rafters with people, yet there was always loneliness, fear and despair. Within its walls lurked insanity, abuse, infidelity and politics. Aruna Chakravarti gathers all these details and turns out a novel in which she recreates the world of 18th century Bengal, especially the privileged yet cloistered world of women.

Chakravarti’s heroes are the Tagore women. They step into Jorasanko as child brides knowing they will leave it only when they die. Yet, confined as they are, they influence, instigate and shape their famous husbands and each other. As the Tagore men plunge into the heart of the Bengal Renaissance, the women also grapple with the changes. While some of them slide into bewildered despair as the sacrosanct rules of the abarodh shift and slacken, others grab the opportunity to step out of their husbands’ shadows and become women of importance in their own right. But they are no gilded lilies, and Chakravarti describes them warts and all.

Of course, there are the milestone moments of Rabindranath Tagore’s life — his muse and his sister-in-law the melancholic Kadambari; his first composition; his relationship with his father, his struggle with western education; his marriage to Mrinalini…

Jorasanko spans the years between 1859 and 1902 and is a haunting narrative. It speaks of a luxurious lifestyle, but it also raises questions about the status of women, even those married to the Tagores. The Tagore women were complex. The bous or daughters-in-law, whose days were spent between their boudoirs and the kitchens were not above intrigue and politics. Some of them were devious and spiteful. They were also strong-willed and stubborn, like Digambari who refused to accept Western ways, even if her husband flirted with them; Jogmaya who took on the men and split the Tagore family; Jnanadanandini who entered Jorasanko as a child bride but who dared to step out and set up an independent household with her husband and children. She also set a fashion trend and showed the Bengali women a new way of wearing the sari! And, of course, Swarnakumari, acknowledged as a pioneer of women’s writing in India.

Then there were those who suffered. Some silently, others like Tripura vocally, and others like Kadambari who unable to bear the terrible loneliness and pain preferred to die.


She didn’t belong here; had never belonged here. She had left her parents at the age of seven and made this house her home. She had embraced her husband’s family and given it all she had. She had thought it was hers. But it wasn’t… No one would shed a genuine tear if she died tomorrow.

 

Veraiconica's Blog

inderjit-singh

Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers

but to be fearless when facing them.

Rabindranath Tagore

Photography Credit artfreelance.me Link: http://wp.me/p2Ag2U-5Yo

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Gypsy Girl

solitude

Bastet and Sekhmet's Library

bamboo

Free Verse

Bamboo Grove

Walking in a bamboo grove
searching for serenity
the rustling leaves
gave me the peace I sought
their shade from harsh light
refreshed my soul.
Basho would say
that harmony can be found
even in a crowded city.
I travelled to a park
among pine trees, palm fronds
and a bamboo grove
and was rewarded.

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Awareness It Self

If there is peace in your mind you will find peace with everybody. If your mind is agitated you will find agitation everywhere. So first find peace within and you will see this inner peace reflected everywhere else. You are this peace! You are happiness, find out. Where else will you find peace if not within you? ~ Papaji

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buddhachic and buttercream

This week my favorites include a variety of Pins detailing different elements in Fashion.  Long skirts, short skirts, bright colors, a mixture in patterns, and a great denim and corduroy look.  When it comes to legends in fashion, Audrey Hepburn will always epitomize amazing style in my view and continues to inspire me, and Grace Coddington of Vogue gave me food for thought this week that I can completely relate to.  What elements in fashion inspire you?  Thank you so much for your comments!

Have a great weekend!

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” and so the mind is made incapable of standing alone and trying to find out. But one must stand alone, completely, totally alone, to find out what is true. “

Teachings Of Masters

Self-knowledge, then, is the beginning of the freedom of the mind. There cannot be understanding of oneself, fundamentally, deeply, if there is any form of assumption, any authority, either of the past or of the present. But the mind is frightened to let go of all authority and investigate because it is afraid of not arriving at a particular result. So the mind is concerned with achieving a result, but not with the investigation to find out, to understand. That is why we cling to authority -religious, psychological, or philosophical. Being afraid, we demand guides, authorities, scriptures, saviors, inspiration in various forms, and so the mind is made incapable of standing alone and trying to find out. But one must stand alone, completely, totally alone, to find out what is true. – Krishnamurti, Amsterdam 1955,Talk 1

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Zen Flash

 

The inner silence is self-surrender.
And that is living without the sense of ego.
Solitude is in the mind of humanity.
Silence is ever speaking;
it is the perennial flow of ‘language.’
It is interrupted by speaking;
for words obstruct this mute language.
Silence is permanent and benefits the whole of humanity.
By Silence, eloquence is meant. It is the best language.
There is a state when words cease and Silence prevails.

~ Ramana Maharshi ~

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