Archive for August 8, 2013


Poetic flavours from Flavorwire

  • Your Favorite Poets’ Favorite Books of Poetry

  • 23 People Who Will Make You Care About Poetry in 2013- ( In the context of Rape Joke by By Patricia Lockwood )

  • The Fascinating, Handwritten Poems of Famous Authors

“Poets don’t draw. They unravel their handwriting and then tie it up again, but differently,” Jean Cocteau once said. When examining the handwritten poems of famous authors — those made popular by their texts and several famous for other art forms — there is an unparalleled intimacy that typed words cannot convey. Many of these poems were born from spontaneous bursts of creativity or late-night meditations, unsparing and instinctive in thought. Words are ostensibly silent, but these handwritten poems speak volumes about their creators. See what poets put pen to paper and revealed their inner worlds.

shelley

 

dickinson

 

Emily Dickinson’s Envelope Poems

 

Emily Dickinson wrote many of her poems on torn scraps of paper, envelopes, and other fragments. Artist Jen Bervin and Dickinson scholar Marta L. Werner have compiled a beautiful collection of the writer’s “envelope poems” in The Gorgeous Nothings, releasing this October. You can pre-order the book about Dickinson’s “crucially important, experimental late work,” or spring for the limited-edition.

 

fitz

 

 

 

dylan

 

Bob Dylan, “Little Buddy”

 

“Your too late sir my doggy’s dead.”

 

A teenage Bob Dylan, born Bobby Zimmerman, proved to be a lyrical artist at an early age in this poetic revision of the Hank Snow song, “Little Buddy.” The future singer-songwriter saw his poem published in the Herzl Herald — the official newspaper of the Wisconsin camp where Dylan spent summers (but didn’t learn the difference between “your” and “you’re”).

 

ode

 

John Keats, “Ode to a Nightingale”

 

Looking at the Romantic poet’s handwritten verse, we can almost imagine him under a plum tree in the garden of his London home. Keats’ friend Charles Armitage Brown observed the poet deep in thought while composing one of his most famous works:

 

“In the spring of 1819 a nightingale had built her nest near my house. Keats felt a tranquil and continual joy in her song; and one morning he took his chair from the breakfast-table to the grass-plot under a plum-tree, where he sat for two or three hours. When he came into the house, I perceived he had some scraps of paper in his hand, and these he was quietly thrusting behind the books. On inquiry, I found those scraps, four or five in number, contained his poetic feelings on the song of our nightingale.”

 

See more handwritten pages by Keats, here.

 

monroe

 

 

 

poe

 

Virginia Clemm Poe’s Valentine’s Day Poem to her Cousin and Husband Edgar Allan Poe

 

“Ever with thee I wish to roam —
Dearest my life is thine.
Give me a cottage for my home
And a rich old cypress vine,
Removed from the world with its sin and care
And the tattling of many tongues.”

 

Although Poe’s teenage wife (his first cousin) was not a poet, she wrote this Valentine’s Day prose to him in 1846 – the year before she died of tuberculosis. At the time, she lived with the troubled author in a small cottage in Fordham (Bronx), New York. The “tattling of many tongues” is believed to be a reference to Poe’s scandalous relationship with writer Frances Sargent Osgood, who was married — though people had plenty to talk about when it came to the boozy, tormented Poe.

 

Bronte

 

Charlotte Brontë’s Tiny Poem

 

“I’ve been wandering in the greenwoods
And mid flowery smiling plains
I’ve been listening to the dark floods
To the thrushes thrilling strains.”

 

The Brontë sisters often wrote their works in a minuscule handwriting on whatever scraps of paper they could find. A magnifying glass is often required to read the texts. ………

 

 

carroll

 

 

emily

 

“There is No Frigate Like a Book (1286),” by Emily Dickinson

 

Short, sweet escapism:

 

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page (read the rest here)

 

thomas

 

“Notes on the Art of Poetry,” by Dylan Thomas

 

The Welsh writer waxes lyrical about the “delight and glory and oddity and light” between pages:

 

I could never have dreamt that there were such goings-on
in the world between the covers of books,
such sandstorms and ice blasts of words,
such staggering peace, such enormous laughter,
such and so many blinding bright lights,
splashing all over the pages (read the rest here)

 

 

 

 

 

pablo

 

“Ode to the Book,” by Pablo Neruda

 

The Chilean poet advises that books invite new possibilities, but we should never forget that wisdom is also gained from experience:

 

When I close a book
I open life.
I hear
faltering cries
among harbours.

 

(read the rest here)

 

RLS

 

“The Land of Story-books,” by Robert Louis Stevenson

 

The magic of books as seen through a child’s eyes:

 

At evening when the lamp is lit,
Around the fire my parents sit;
They sit at home and talk and sing,
And do not play at anything.

 

Now, with my little gun, I crawl
All in the dark along the wall,
And follow round the forest track
Away behind the sofa back.

 

There, in the night, where none can spy,
All in my hunter’s camp I lie,
And play at books that I have read
Till it is time to go to bed.

 

(read the rest here)

 

Painting of William Wordsworth

 

“The Prelude (Book Fifth — Books),” by William Wordsworth

 

An epic poem that frames books as doors to dream worlds and autobiographical reflections:

 

While listlessly I sate, and, having closed
The book, had turned my eyes toward the wide sea.
On poetry and geometric truth,
And their high privilege of lasting life,
From all internal injury exempt,
I mused; upon these chiefly: and at length,
My senses yielding to the sultry air,
Sleep seized me, and I passed into a dream.  (read the full poem here)

 

 

service

 

We couldn’t choose a favorite between these charming Robert William Service poems — one of which laments that the writer never has enough time to read as much as he’d like (i.e. all the time):

 

“Bookshelf,” by Robert William Service

 

I like to think that when I fall,
A rain-drop in Death’s shoreless sea,
This shelf of books along the wall,
Beside my bed, will mourn for me.

 

(read the rest here)

 

“Book Lover,” by Robert William Service

 

I keep collecting books I know
I’ll never, never read;
My wife and daughter tell me so,
And yet I never head.
“Please make me,” says some wistful tome,
“A wee bit of yourself.”
And so I take my treasure home,
And tuck it in a shelf.

 

And now my very shelves complain;
They jam and over-spill.
They say: “Why don’t you ease our strain?”
“some day,” I say, “I will.”
So book by book they plead and sigh;
I pick and dip and scan;
Then put them back, distrest that I
Am such a busy man. (read the rest here)

 

 

macdowell

 

“Old Books,” by Margaret Widdemer

 

The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet reminds us that books are the best kind of soul medicine:

 

The people up and down the world that talk and laugh and cry,
They’re pleasant when you’re young and gay, and life is all to try,
But when your heart is tired and dumb, your soul has need of ease,
There’s none like the quiet folk who wait in libraries–
The counselors who never change, the friends who never go,
The old books, the dear books that understand and know!

 

(read the rest here)

 

guest

 

“Good Books,” by Edgar Guest

 

The homespun poet allows us to identify with his sheer joy and appreciation for books:

 

Good books are friendly things to own.
If you are busy they will wait.
They will not call you on the phone
Or wake you if the hour is late.
They stand together row by row,
Upon the low shelf or the high.
But if you’re lonesome this you know:
You have a friend or two nearby. (read the rest here)

 

 

 

 

 

Shades of poetry

Happy Flowers

Quaint pink beauties

Lovely

Love the line – sky is raining gold , Life, sunshine and hope.

Words That Flow Like Water

The sky is overcast,

With the grey shadows of the winter,

Blessing the land,

With the gift of life,

Flowing with liquid,

Rich, clean, clear and blue.

The rain passes with a thunder

And a roar,

Quaking the land,

And shaking little tails

Poking out from small, unseen,

Little hideaways

Leaving behind its darkness,

Sheltering the land.

The heavy liquid,

Flattens the land,

Mowing it down,

As it rests,

And bathes,

In the storm of the day.

Then it sparkles,

Little twinkling shines of light,

Blink, left and right,

Waking,

Brightening,

Sparkling

As the evening sun sets.

Its light pours over the storm,

Like and overflow of genius,

Tucked under fear.

It explodes,

In the evening,

Across the clearing sky,

Raining gold,

Painting the land,

No—bathing it,

In yellow, dying it,

This shade of tomorrow.

What is this feeling?

Of utter bliss?

Of amazement?

Of a yellow coloured world?

What…

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Words That Flow Like Water

 

Take away the pain,

Aching in my heart,

Butterfly with white wings,

And the symbol of death,

Etched on its back,

Burned by power of

Past and history,

Presented to the future,

With hope and,

Change.

Change the world with

The flap of your effervescent wings,

Glimmering in the darkness,

Of hope undenied.

One moment in time,

Sifted in the light,

Of the Time Lady herself,

The change that will come,

And the change that will give,

The freedom of life,

And the gift of the heavens,

Shining bright,

Glowing gold,

Singing the praises,

Of a future to behold.

Take away the pain,

Seared in my heart,

Burned by ecstasy,

Butterfly of change,

Flap your wings for me,

Give me the strength I crave

To stand up,

Be brave,

And face the future,

I am so afraid of.

Give me happiness,

Sadness,

Love,

And brightness.

I will change the…

View original post 40 more words

The bouquet

  • Bei Dao (poet4justicedotwordpressdotcom.wordpress.com)

poet4justicedotwordpressdotcom

“the bouquet

Between me and the world
you are a bay, a sail
the faithful ends of a rope
you are a fountain, a wind,
a shrill childhood cry.

Between me and the world
you are a picture frame, a window
a field covered in wildflowers
you are a breath, a bed,
a night that keeps the stars company.

Between me and the world,
you are a calendar, a compass
a ray of light that slips through the gloom
you are a biographical sketch, a book mark
a preface that comes at the end.

between me and the world
you are a gauze curtain, a mist
a lamp shining in my dreams
you are a bamboo flute, a song without words
a closed eyelid carved in stone.

Between me and the world
you are a chasm, a pool
an abyss plunging down
you are a balustrade, a wall
a shield’s…

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No More Illusions

Tranqulity of reality breaking the illusions of fantasy

Source of Inspiration

flower8

I have been stripped of my
carefully nurtured illusions.
I have seen the stark reality
of existence unsoftened by dreams
or silent hopes. No wishful
fantasies clothe my self-conceived
choices. I have seen myself as
a pitiful, insignificant, momentary
spark of life soon forgotten.

There comes a moment of explosion;
illusion is no more. What emerges
from this volcanic eruption is the
seed of Creator bursting into full bloom.

I am
You are
We are
of and from
the Creator
Omnipotent
One with All
only
One

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Reminds of the past and lost glory of ancestral houses in Indian villages

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freaky folk tales

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the curious case of the moated grange

I have long held a fascination with the life and times of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; not, however, his detective writing, nor the subsequent debunking of the many psychic charlatans that courted him, but more his inimitable style in documenting sensational tales of hauntings, and the rather odd relationship he had with women, in particular his mother, Mary Doyle, a preeminent force in Conan Doyle’s life.

In 1927, several newspapers ran articles on a tale that was eventually to become one of the many compiled in his last published work, The Edge of the Unknown. It is a particularly curious tale, and, I must say, one that always tends to send a slight shiver down my spine; though I am at odds to explain why – whether it is the strangeness of the medium’s gender mutation or the ghost’s mother-fixation so curiously reminiscent of Doyle’s own life, I can’t quite…

View original post 1,020 more words