Archive for March 19, 2013


zen habits

excerpt from               http://zenhabits.net/change/

How to Implement Daily Changes

This method is fairly simple, and if you really implement it, nearly foolproof:

  1. One Change at a Time.
  2. Start Small. OK, I’ve said this two bajillion times. No one ever does it, though. Start with 10 minutes or less. Five minutes is better if it’s a hard change. If you fail at that, drop it to 2 minutes.
  3. Do it at the same time each day.
  4. Make a huge commitment to someone.
  5. Be accountable.
  6. Have consequences.
  7. Enjoy the change.

 

The wound is the place where the Light enters you.
– Rumi

Wounding and healing are not opposites. They’re part of the same thing.
It is our wounds that enable us to be compassionate with the wounds of others.
It is our limitations that make us kind to the limitations of other people.
It is our loneliness that helps us to to find other people or to even
know they’re alone with an illness.
― Rachel Naomi Remen, M.D.

cloudssssssss

TwistedSifter

 

Jakob Wagner is a photographer from Herdecke, Germany. After completing a three-year apprenticeship, Jakob has been living in Dusseldorf as a freelance photographer, image editor and photo assistant. When he’s not on assignment, he devotes much of his time and passion to his personal photography projects that will eventually culminate in future books and exhibitions. Much of his work centers around aerial photography as well as nightscape, landscape and cityscape photography.

In this series, entitled Sea of Clouds, Wagner took aerial photographs above the Mediterranean Sea. You can see the entire series along with many other amazing projects at his official website jakobwagner.eu. You can also find an extensive portfolio of his work on Behance. For signed and limited edition prints, please contact Jakob direct.

 

1.

aboove the clouds jakob wagner (1)

Photograph by JAKOB WAGNER

 

 

2.

aboove the clouds jakob wagner (2)

Photograph by JAKOB WAGNER

 

 

3.

aboove the clouds jakob wagner (4)

Photograph by JAKOB WAGNER

 

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http://bookriot.com/2013/01/29/dead-writers-perfume/

Perfumes Inspired by Dead Writers –

a few………..

Jane Austen: Darjeeling tea, snowdrops and pansies (flowers from her garden), meadow grass

Dorothy Parker: Whiskey sour, vanilla, mandarin, white musk

the Bronte Sisters: Heather, sea air, vetiver, primrose, black tea

Louisa May Alcott: Fir tree, red currant, blood orange, coffee beans

Tolstoy: Vodka, musk, black tea, black peppercorn, cedar

Dickens: Cloves, tobacco, patchouli, brandy water, river water

what about agatha christie ?????????????????????         ( ……. or rand or doyle or maugham…………etc.etc ) , but gud to see austen and the bronte sis’ s in 1 place

q

“Your heart is the size of an ocean.
Go find yourself in its hidden depths.”

~Rumi 

https://i2.wp.com/24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lxhx63vHyr1r764gxo1_500.jpg

introversion

“Hardly anybody ever writes anything nice about introverts. Extroverts rule. This is rather odd when you realise that about nineteen writers out of twenty are introverts. We have been taught to be ashamed of not being ‘outgoing’. But a writer’s job is ingoing.” ― Ursula K. Le Guin

“Hardly anybody ever writes anything nice about introverts. Extroverts rule. This is rather odd when you realise that about nineteen writers out of twenty are introverts. We have been taught to be ashamed of not being ‘outgoing’. But a writer’s job is ingoing.”

― Ursula K. Le Guin

“Sometimes my day is crammed full of people and talk and yet I have the feeling of living in utter peace and quiet. And the tree outside my window, in the evenings, is a greater experience than all those people put together.”  ― Etty Hillesum

“Sometimes my day is crammed full of people and talk and yet I have the feeling of living in utter peace and quiet. And the tree outside my window, in the evenings, is a greater experience than all those people put together.”

― Etty Hillesum

“I’ve always been a sort of self-imposed outsider, not a geeky outsider or a snobby outsider, but I just have a natural desire to live on the fringe. I’m not like a weirdo with a trench-coat, but I just prefer to be alone or minimally surrounded by people.” ― Sara Quin

“I’ve always been a sort of self-imposed outsider, not a geeky outsider or a snobby outsider, but I just have a natural desire to live on the fringe. I’m not like a weirdo with a trench-coat, but I just prefer to be alone or minimally surrounded by people.”

― Sara Quin

“Cherish your solitude. Take trains by yourself to places you have never been. Sleep out alone under the stars. Learn how to drive a stick shift. Go so far away that you stop being afraid of not coming back. Say no when you don’t want to do something. Say yes if your instincts are strong, even if everyone around you disagrees. Decide whether you want to be liked or admired. Decide if fitting in is more important than finding out what you’re doing here.”

― Eve Ensler

“The reason I talk to myself is because I’m the only one whose answers I accept.”  ― George Carlin

“The reason I talk to myself is because I’m the only one whose answers I accept.”― George Carlin

“You are who you are when nobody’s watching.”

― Stephen Fry

http://www.desiretoinspire.net/blog/2013/3/18/revisiting-anita-calero.html –       artdeco.ish +retro – luvit         

 

id-links

redsplash.jpg

How Not To Worry

find this concept somewhat similar to indian philosophy………………….

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/03/18/you-can-master-life-1934

We should make ourselves stop trying to explain our own difficulties. Our first impulse is to try to account for them, figure out why what has happened did happen. Sometimes such an effort is beneficial: more often it is distinctly harmful. It leads to introspection, self-pity, and vain regret; and almost invariably it creates within us a dangerous mood of confusion and despair. Many of life’s hard situations cannot be explained. They can only be endured, mastered, and gradually forgotten. Once we learn this truth, once we resolve to use all our energies managing life rather than trying to explain life, we take the first and most obvious step toward significant accomplishment.

……………………. Gilkey revisits the subject through the lens of aging:

Only as we yield to the inexorable, only as we accept the situations which we find ourselves powerless to change, can we free ourselves from fatal inward tensions, and acquire that inward quietness amid which we can seek — and usually find — ways by which our limitations can be made at least partially endurable.

Why is [this] so difficult for most people? because most of us were told in childhood that the way to conquer a difficulty is to fight it and demolish it. That theory is, of course, the one that should be taught to young people. Many of the difficulties we encounter in youth are not permanent; and the combination of a heroic courage, a resolute will, and a tireless persistence will often — probably usually — break them down. But in later years the essential elements in the situation change. We find in our little world prison-walls which no amount of battering will demolish. Within those walls we must spend our day — spend them happily, or resentfully. Under these new circumstances we must deliberately reverse our youthful technique. We must gain victory, not by assaulting the walls, but by accepting them. Only when this surrender is made can we assure ourselves of inward quietness, and locate the net step on the road to ultimate victory.