http://www.bradpriddy.com/yoga/sequen.htmSequencing of asanas

http://anamikas.hubpages.com/hub/Yogic-Exercises-for-Diseases-Health-Conditions

http://www.remedyspot.com/articles/241-yoga-ayurveda-exercise-basis-good-health.html

http://www.yogajournal.com/lifestyle/864

http://www.svaroopayoga.org/contemplation.asp

Certain yogic disciplines are well known since ancient times. If you don’t set yourself to them, you may find them happening quite naturally, including:

  • The 3:30 am wake-up call — meditation is calling your name.
  • Early to bed — ready to go to bed with the sun (or soon after).
  • Simplicity — how much of anything do you really need?
  • Living lightly — matching your food intake to what you need, not what you want; or empty out your purse (or your car).
  • Silence — cultivating inner silence by finding opportunities for outer silence.
  • Going without — giving up comforts and pleasures, even giving up things you consider to be necessities (even when they are not).
  • Generosity — giving time, energy and/or money to those you want to support, but giving more than the easy amount.
  • Doing more — tackling a practice or a project, or holding yourself to a higher standard.

You get nowhere in life without tapas. You cannot complete your education, buy or rent a home, keep a job, grow a garden, raise a child or stay married without tapas. There is a hidden secret in the practice of tapas: the karmic effects. The law of karma says that everything you do has repercussions. When you “pick your poison,” doing tapas in the arena you choose, the benefits extend into every area of your life. This principle is well known in India, where a person will undertake an arduous climb to a holy site so that they can get a good job. It works!

I remember giving things up for Lent when I was a child, a form of tapas. Yogis embark on similar periods of intense practice, perhaps by attending a yoga training or retreat — truly tapas! You can create a similar “intensive” for yourself by tackling a pose you don’t like to do, working on it daily for a month, or perhaps giving up television and doing yoga during that time for a week or a year.

The key is that you decide what you’re going to do. If it’s an easy decision, it probably isn’t really tapas. But if you pick something that is too hard, you might not be able to actually do it. So pick a challenge you know you need, but one that you can actually do. Tell your yoga-buddies, so they can encourage and support you. But I must warn you of one seductive aspect to tapas: When you meet the challenge you’ve set for yourself, you might find that you like it so much that it becomes part of your lifestyle. I used to hate the 3:30 am wake-up call, and now I love it!

http://www.auroville.org/vision/integralyoga.htm

http://observedinbooks.blogspot.in/2008/02/complete-artists-way-by-julia-cameron.html

http://www.yoga-age.com/asanas/prana.html

http://www.thepragmaticyogi.com/2010/07/asana-analysis-reclined-herosupta.html

http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=10856