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Advasana

Lie down on your stomach, with the forehead resting on the floor. The big toes should be touching each other and the heels should be allowed to flop to the sides. If you find difficulty in breathing, place a pillow under the chest.Breathing: As you breathe naturally and without extra effort, notice the gentle rising and falling of the spinal column. Surrender yourself to the floor and gradually start breathing longer and deeper. Try to breathe steadily. You can continue in this position for as long as you wish.Benefits: This is a position of surrender and makes the mind calm down rapidly. If you have a short temper, this asana will help to a great extent. When you feel that you are on the verge of an emotional outburst, move away from the situation and lie down in advasana. Keep focusing on the incoming and outgoing breath rather than your agitated thoughts. Shashankasana (Rabbit posture)

You can easily visualise an angry person, animal or bird, but you will find it very difficult to visualise an angry rabbit. This is what Shashankasana helps you to achieve.

Do this asana for a few minutes every day. If you find it difficult to bring your forehead to the floor, use a cushion for support. Keep the big toes together and the heels outwards and sit with the buttocks in the space between the heels. Try to settle down in this posture, allowing the spinal column to stretch fully. Continue sitting in this manner for a few minutes.

Breathing: Breathe in a relaxed and normal manner. Sheetali Pranayama Sit in any comfortable cross-legged posture, close your eyes and relax the body. Put your tongue out as much as possible and turn the sides of the tongue upwards, trying to bring the edges together to form a tube.Breathing: Inhale deeply through this tube, draw in the tongue, close your mouth and then exhale through the nostrils. When you are inhaling through the tube, there should be a sound of air rushing in. Once again, open the mouth, form the tube, inhale, close the mouth and exhale through the nostrils. Continue this for one to two minutes.

During the summers, you can do this pranayama for a longer period.

WARNING: People with low blood pressure and respiratory tract disorders should avoid doing this asana. Those with heart diseases should not attempt breath retention.The best time for this pranayama is late at night — before you retire for the day, or early in the morning — when it is relatively silent outside. If you are extremely tensed up, you can do it for up to half-an-hour. However, it must be done sitting down. Once again, if you have heart ailments, avoid breath retention.